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hi guys!

new to the boards here - just wanted to say hello :)

i've never ridden a motorcycle before - just as passenger - and am looking to purchase one soon - i've been told that a 600rr isn't a great beginner bike... so was wondering is that totally true? i found one that i really like and it just spoke to me... :)

glad to have found this site - look forward to participating more

thanks!
 

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hi guys!

new to the boards here - just wanted to say hello :)

i've never ridden a motorcycle before - just as passenger - and am looking to purchase one soon - i've been told that a 600rr isn't a great beginner bike... so was wondering is that totally true? i found one that i really like and it just spoke to me... :)

glad to have found this site - look forward to participating more

thanks!
it has been said that the RR is not a good beginner bike, and many here will say that. but i'm one of those who started on an RR as my very first bike and i'll say by experience that its a good bike to start on and is a blast to ride!!!

it all depends if you take the right steps towards riding. take the MSF, get good gear, and practice practice practice is key!

if it speaks to you, GET IT!!:toothy4:
 

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It depends on your disposition, your confidence, your dexterity and fine motor control, attention to the environment and many other factors.

It is said that 99% of motorcycles now are better than their riders. Today's race replicas are capable of an envelope of performance that many do not even come close to touching.

I would not recommend the RR, or any of the other race replica 600's as a first bike unless the user has had experience with dirt riding. There are many excellent choices of bikes that will develop riding skills and habits without the severe consequences of an error. The power to weight ratio and tightly tuned suspension helps secure confidence well into speeds where 'softer' bikes would tell you 'hey, slow down.'

While I understand how unattractive the idea of buying an ugly or small bike is, often you can find awesome deals on private sales of these bikes in your local craigslist or classifieds that you can re-sell in 4 to 6 months at no loss to you, and you'll get to become acclimated to riding on something that will be less punishing. (also, you can get your drops and dumps out of the way instead of rashing your baby.)

Edit: Re-reading the initial post, I have to mention that a motorcycle training course is a must (usually the Motorcycle Safety Foundation Basic Rider Course). Takes only 3 days and is geared to those that have never ridden a bike before. Successful completion of the course nets you a card that you can take to your local DMV/BMV and get your motorcycle endorsement without further testing.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
gotcha - that's good to hear that someone first learned on a 600rr :)

yes of course - i'd be taking full training courses and safety ed as well - i've been reading a lot of stuff online and getting tips/pointers etc...

my utmost importance is safety...

i've been browsing craiglist for a while now with good deals on older beginner bikes which would be fine - at least to work my way up to the 600rr :) (suppose it's my dreambike for now) - it's just sitting at a local dealership calling my name... lol

would you suggest i purchase the 600rr and let it sit for a year until i gather experience on a way-less sophisticated bike? (or is that pretty much a waste and just wait until another one pops up somewhere...)

thanks for the feedback :)
 

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Bikes depreciate kind of fast, especially from the Big 4 (they're too common.) There will be plenty of 600RR's waiting when you're ready to buy, and the price will come down some on the used '07's.
 

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Welcome to the site. I also learned to ride on my rr so it can be used as a beginner bike. Any bike can be..it all just depends on the rider and their comfort level and how much of their brain they decide to use.

Congrats on whatever bike you do get and just remember...take it slow!
 

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It depends on your disposition, your confidence, your dexterity and fine motor control, attention to the environment and many other factors.
#1 would be your maturity level.

Also, Where do you live. If you live somwhere with a lot of nice back roads to practice on, I'd say go for it. The RR was my first bike that I owned as well, and with the right maturity level and approach to learning, the bike, GO FOR IT.

I also didn't go smaller for a first bike because I didn't want to push it up hills. 250# on a 250 or 500 isn't going to work.
 

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i started on a sportbike and crashed pretty badly that year, and i know a lot of people who have done the same. I used to ride fairly immature till i started riding Honda's??? dont ask. But im not saying it cant be done but most learn a lot quicker how to ride and how to ride responsible on something thats not so track based. oh yea and prepare to drop the bike if its your first sportbike haha might not happen but be prepared.
 

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there is no way you could keep an rr in the garage for a year with out riding it... IMPOSSIBLE! but if you can do it then more power to you. An rr is not an ideal beginner bike but i know people who have started with an rr and are doing fine. so it really depends on you.

welcome to the site

gear up and
ride safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
cool - yes i am fairly mature - especially when it comes to safety...

tomorrow i'm taking my permit test and also registering for msf training :)

was also looking at a 1981 yamaha sr-something 250 something lol (beginner bike?)

but once i take the training courses i'll know for sure what i'd be ready for as a beginner bike

it's reassuring to know that some of you learned on the 600rr :)

and yeah - chef babu you're right - would be very difficult not to take it out for a year if i get it now lol

thanks for all the input :)

i'll be posting more and keep you all updated!
 

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I would have to agree with the people saying that starting on a 600cc sportbike is a bad idea...

I learned on a dual sport kawi klr 650.. in my opinion perfect learners bike..

but after around two months of riding the kawi i decided to buy a brand spanking new 600rr... And when i rode the 600rr home i was just thinking 'THANK GOD I didnt start on a sportbike.' Dont get me wrong i love my 07cbr to death but a newb with sportbike speed does not mix well together.

that being said.. learn first until u feel comfortable with riding.. and then splurge on the 600rr that you have always dreamed of.
 

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What up man, prepare to spend lots of cash money on your RR!! Because stock wont cut it. Before you buy anything check the parts/gear threads for great deals! Also Dont forget to change your MUFFLER BEARINGS AND BLINKER FLUID OUT! i put synthetic blinker fluid in my bike and the blinkers blink much better..
Good luck!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
awesome :)

well guys - just took my permit test earlier today and PASSED woohoo :)
just got 1 question wrong...

registered for MSF - july 18th - will keep ya posted :)
 

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yeah im getting my like-new 600rr next week, gonna be my first bike.

many people will generalize and say dont do it, but it all depends on your ability and responsibility.

i personally took the msf class before anything, after completing it with a perfect score, and finding riding extremely easy, i realized itd be a waste of time and money for me to get a 250 to start like i originally planned.

Just because i found it simple, doesnt mean the 3 people i the class that dropped their bikes numerous times and failed out thought it was easy, or the ones who were wobbling all over the place at slow speed or couldnt do the figure 8's without putting their foot down a couple times.

that being said when i pickup my bike next week the only riding i will be doing the next few months will be in parking lots practicing, practicing practicing, and lowkey cruises on the empty open local roads at night that im very familiar with. afterall im only getting the bike for fun. you can get the bike you want, you just have to be smart and responsible about it, also dependant on how youre going to use it, it should of course fit you as well. im a short guy and cbr's fit me very well, unlike something like the R6.
 

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Personally, I would start with a bike that you care about dropping. Even if you do get a perfect score at the MSF. Riding on the street is a lot different. You actually have to pay more attention because of all the cagers that don't look for you. Whatever you decide to get, gear should be a top priority. Good luck and be safe!
 
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