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Discussion Starter #1
I just did my 6th track day at New York Safety Track (NYST). I stepped up from the novice to the intermediate group for the first time. It was a significant step up in class as the lap times were quite a bit faster. I was consistently dropping back and ended up 3rd from last in every session. This fine as I expect to drop back until I get better at it. I had a great time and enjoyed it quite a lot. The problem is I have too much lean angle and wind up closer to a low side condition than I should. The coaches advise me to get ½ a cheek off and be sure to move my head over to where the mirror would have been. I tried to improve my position in the last two sessions, but my lean angle improvements were minimal. I guess I need more practice. The last time I was there, I had the track guy set up my suspension for me, so I figure that's pretty close. I left everything the same since he did it except I softened the rear shocks by 2 detents (currently set on 3, I'm 160 lbs) because I'm short a have a difficult time reaching the ground. I really have no grasp of how big of a change this is when I'm hard on it in a corner, probably should put this back to where he had set it up to. In turn 12/13 I dragged my frame slider (its a giant slider, I estimate it will hit at 62 deg lean angle), scared me, stood it up, rode thru the grass, then got back on the track and kept going. Lucky I got away with it! Cuddo's to a brand new Q3+!
What advice can you give me in this regard as a newer track rider?
 

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Best advice I was ever given at my first track day echos what you were told: put your ass crack on the edge of the seat that’s inside the corner and try to put my head where the mirror is.

I went from literally grinding half the footpeg (not the feeler, the peg itself) away to dragging a knee and being extremely confident in cornering. It’s advice I still use today.

Other than that: Be confident, trust the bike, trust your gear and trust yourself. If you hesitate, second guess, get worried, etc. you’ll be thinking of that and not the road. The bike will outride you for a long, long time so believe in it to get you through and I’m telling you it will. Put the suspension back to where they had it set as well and learn to stop on the balls of your feet.

And have fun!!!
 

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Check out the youtube videos by Life at Lean! Guy has lots of track information and advice on body position.

Audi S4 + CBR600rr enthusiast Tapatalk
 

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Your ass isn't going to do much to reduce lean angle, but your shoulders sure will.

Work on extending your outside arm when cornering, this will give you room to move your upper body inwards.



Also, you didn't lean the bike 62 degrees lol who are you MM93?


When you're in a corner your suspension is compressed, this reduces ride height and ground clearance. softening your shock probably made this worse. If you caught a bump the suspension would nearly bottom and you maybe caught the slider on a curb or something.
 

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Your ass isn't going to do much to reduce lean angle, but your shoulders sure will.

Work on extending your outside arm when cornering, this will give you room to move your upper body inwards.



Also, you didn't lean the bike 62 degrees lol who are you MM93?


When you're in a corner your suspension is compressed, this reduces ride height and ground clearance. softening your shock probably made this worse. If you caught a bump the suspension would nearly bottom and you maybe caught the slider on a curb or something.
LOL <3 MM93

wibbly is spot on. Slightly softer suspension or you are just leaning in a bit more and the lowered clearance from leaning caused the slider to touch down.

I would suggest that you first use your vision to look through the turn (this will naturally set your head and shoulders in the right position), then use your core to position your legs and allow your shoulder / head to drop into the corner a bit. If you use vision + relaxed upper body, you'll find that you don't have to work very hard for correct body position.

Honestly the most important thing is to work on your reference points and consistency. Once you know where your reference points are and you are riding kind of on rails, you can focus a lot more on body position without sacrificing your line / safety. If you can't hold your reference points and stay on line, slow down. Slow down to go faster!

NYST is a fantastic track. I'll be there June 23rd-24th with Tony's Track Days.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all the tips guys! Probably going back on June 30th. I'll be slowing down a bit and working on body position. Practice, practice, practice! The 62 degrees was an estimate based on static angle references. Either way, it's way wrong and I need to fix it! Cheers and Happy riding!
 

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Move your butt a little. Move your shoulders a lot. Its like your trying to lean forward off the bike. Its a bit uncomfortable of a feeling at first, at least it was for me. The more your off the bike the better usually. Outside knee, hands, half your ass, and feet. Thats all that should be touching the bike. Your FOR SURE going to lowside if you keep this up. Get off the bike! :D
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I was only "sliding" my ass over, and trying to move my upper body over, without actually getting up/off the bike. I did some practicing on the road and getting up/off the bike makes it easy to "feel" the difference in CG. I'll definitely be working on this, but at least I now know what doing it right feels like! Thanks again!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Did another trackday at NYST Friday. Blackbeard Racing hosted the all day "open track" event. It was a perfect opportunity to work on my body position. Only 28 riders total, 2 sessions. 9:00-12:00, and 1:00-5:00. Go on and off track for as much riding as you can handle! I managed a whopping 220 miles (105 laps), and couldn't have done much more! I was beat! I improved my body position significantly. Now that I understand how the body position effects the CG of the bike/rider, it's much easier to work on improving it. No hard part contact this time! Thanks for the advise! So much fun!
BTW, If you have an opportunity to do an all day "open track" event, do it! Best track day I've been to yet!
 

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If you have some pictures of yourself on the bike they may be helpful to post, so we can actually see your body position.

My advice:

Take

those

sliders

off

The are mounted crazy low and if you catch that on something it can go bad very easily. Sliders don't really prevent a lot of damage and they have drawbacks depending on how they mount. Get case covers/case savers instead.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Here's a couple of pictures from the session when I clipped the slider. There weren't any pictures of me actually hitting the slider, but it's clear that my body position is wrong. No photographer at last session when I (think I) did much better.
 

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That's not terrible, at least you're not crossed up. Uh, get some pucks

This is a weird sensation, but next time, slide your ass back until it almost touches the tail. Your crotch should very rarely be up against the tank. By putting your butt back you create a lot more space to move your legs around the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yeah, got pucks now. Thanks. Last time out I did put my butt back and it does makes things easier. I'm getting the hang of it now, just need more practice.
 

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I'd get rid of those sliders before heading to the track. It seems it's at the same height as your footpegs.

If you touch your knee or toe, you can move it out of the way. If you touch your sliders that are attached to your bike, you'll probably end up eating dirt if you keep doing it. It's going to "lift" the bike off the ground at one point.

Invest in some engine protectors and higher-mounted, low profile sliders. I go through Shogun sliders every season. Didn't see the need to spend 100's on something that is meant to be wasted...
 
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