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Discussion Starter #1
I know what a highside is, but why does it happen?
I know what a lowside is , but why does it happen?

When I ride, I try to ride responsably especially during turns. However I don't really know what must be done during a turn in case there's an object to avoid. Do I use the rear brake only? Front only or both?

Can anyone give me a turn-101 or give me a link?
 

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hi=too much throttle too fast outta turn..
lo= front tuck in mid/entry turn
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I don't think I made myself clear. My question is why do highsides/lowsides happen and what must I do to prevent them? A.k.A how do I stop in a turn?
 

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I'm guessing you haven't taken a basic MSF course, because that's one of the things they teach. If you need to slow/stop in a turn you have to stand the bike up, apply the brakes(both), and either stop, or lean back over and continue the turn.

Highsides happen when the rear tire breaks traction, and then suddenly regains traction. A highside can happen in a turn when you lock the rear brake, realize this, and release it. That's why the MSF course teaches to keep the rear wheel loclked if it occurs.

Lowsides occur when the front tire loses grip. If you're leaned over and there's no more grip, the only way you're going to go is down. Simple.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I live in Canada, more precicely Montreal, and there is no MSF course, only race school. Which is 400$/day.
 

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while cornering if you have a lot of lean angle and try to get on the accelerator to hard you can loose traction completely and lay the bike down or low side. but if the rear tire will loose traction and then catch again it can throw you off the opposite side you are turning into and cause a high side. at least thats my knowledge on it in a nut shell
 

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there are too many different ways to list to cause a high/lowside but training wheel hero hit it. highside = fall of front, lowside=fall of back
 

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i've experienced (almost) low-siding but managed to correct and save it as i'm turning/leaning. normally low-siding u lose traction in the front tire, or ur leaned too far over that the bike falls to the side.

high-side i've never experienced (and hopefully never) but is explained above by losing rear tire traction.

normally if you need to correct or avoid an object in a turn, straighten up the bike and apply both brakes simultaneously. good luck.
 

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I live in Canada, more precicely Montreal, and there is no MSF course, only race school. Which is 400$/day.
Even if this is the case, you should be able to find some sort of school. However the internet is a wonderful thing if you look on it. The page that PhantomX2K put above this is also very good.

Highside
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Highsider

Lowside
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lowside

I read though there and sounds good and well written. See if it helps you.
 

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that is why every track day i have attended instructors have said dont touch the rear brake unless you are straight up and down

the rear rotor on my 1000 has been lightened so much it doesnt even grab any more

i had just a little over a pound of metal machined out of it

i can stomp the rear brake now and all it does is give a slight drag
 

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that is why every track day i have attended instructors have said dont touch the rear brake unless you are straight up and down

the rear rotor on my 1000 has been lightened so much it doesnt even grab any more

i had just a little over a pound of metal machined out of it

i can stomp the rear brake now and all it does is give a slight drag
Or you can put air bubbles in your brake lines, but that needs to be done by someone who has experience with it, I don't recommend experimenting other than on a closed, non track area....

I live in Canada, more precicely Montreal, and there is no MSF course, only race school. Which is 400$/day.


But you have a great health care system, no??

Sorry, "America Junior" -Homer Simpson.
 

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On the Q about avoiding something in a turn, be sure not to target fixate. That is, don't look at what you are trying to avoid, look where you want to go instead. If you are staring at that pothole you don't want to hit, you're gonna hit it. If you are staring beyond the pothole at the clear area of the road you want to ride through, you will most likely go there. Braking in a turn is never a good idea, especially at deep lean angles. Most times somebody brakes in a turn, there was no need, your bike handles very well, you would have probably made it through anyway.
 

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new york isnt far away. see if you can find an msf near the border.
 

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Okay i'm not sure how exactly the MSF course works, so correct me if I'm wrong. Isn't it a one day course that teaches you how to ride in the parking lot and then on the streets?

Well, here in Canada(specifically Quebec), it is mandatory to take a motorcycle course. Which inlcludes 8 hours of in class theory, 18 hours of parking lot practice, 4 hours of street riding. And the exam has 3 parts as well. There's a waiting period of approx 8 months before you get your full permit. It's a very long and time consuming process...but it filters out a lot of squids :D

@Mx6420: If you want to attend a track day, contact Mecaglisse. Their rates are around $95/day which is really cheap. They also offer intruductory courses on the track which go for $235. You use your own bike. I've heard some really good comments about the course. I signed up for the July 8th class :)
 
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