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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I just got a new to me 2009 cbr600rr with
Front: Nix 30 Cartridge 10.0 spring
Rear: Hypersport TTX GP Shock .95 spring
I weight 77kg/169.5lbs without gear
Can any please tell me what spring rates are good for me??
Ive been researching in racetech and ohlins and im finding different values


also if anyone can tell me the springrates for this forks and shocks
also i can find ohline fork springs but cant seem to find ohlins shock springs

Thanks for all the help
 

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I just got a new to me 2009 cbr600rr with
Front: Nix 30 Cartridge 10.0 spring
Rear: Hypersport TTX GP Shock .95 spring
I weight 77kg/169.5lbs without gear
Can any please tell me what spring rates are good for me??
Ive been researching in racetech and ohlins and im finding different values


also if anyone can tell me the springrates for this forks and shocks
also i can find ohline fork springs but cant seem to find ohlins shock springs

Thanks for all the help
Call the Ohlins service center you plan to have the suspension work done at and they can help you find the right spring rate. Otherwise a call to Ohlins USA (or see if they have an Ohlins Canada headquarters) service center and they can help as well. They can also point you where to buy shock springs.

Based only on your weight, no idea the way you plan to ride (street only, track only, combination, you like a firm or softer ride, bad roads, etc.) but I’d put you in a 9.0 fork spring. The shock spring rate should be a 90, 95, 100, 110 and not the same decimal point as the front, that may help you find it. I’m surprised you have a 10.0 front and 95 rear, that may be right for the RR but I’d say for a 10.0 front I’d expect a 100 or 105 shock but again, I’m guessing and I am fat so I usually have a 105 or 110. Your 95 shock spring might be right on is what I’m saying.

My only other advice to you is two fold: use the Ohlins oil, seals and fluids when rebuilding and setting things up and with Ohlins I would always error on the side of softer because they usually spec slightly firmer springs. So if you are between a 9.0 and 9.5 fork spring go 9.0 or do one 9.0 and one 9.5 spring for an effective 9.25 rate. I’m running .95 springs in my Ohlins forks on my Ducati and it’s basically perfect even though I should be a 10.0 or even a 10.5.

And make sure they get serviced if you don’t know the last time it’s been done, Ohlins stuff needs constant refreshing to work well, like every 2 years.
 
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I agree with miweber929, it would be guesswork. My guess is that 1.0 is on the firm side, .90 ~. 95 might work.
I weigh about one kilogram more, and use .95 but on a stock cartridge. Street, rough roads, on pace.
I find the .95 front and rear very good, comparing to the OEM of course, but next service I may be going to a longer spacer, and have been thinking about dropping a .90 in one side like miweber929 said.
 

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2009 here.
Used Racetech spring calculator for front.
With gear I weigh about 165 lbs.
0.9 front (OE forks with GP suspension cartridges) (or is it 9.0?)
0.95 rear (Ohlins H0604, the predecessor to the TTX)
Very good feel on front end.
Rear seems to be plush with the 0.95
Roads only, no track.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Call the Ohlins service center you plan to have the suspension work done at and they can help you find the right spring rate. Otherwise a call to Ohlins USA (or see if they have an Ohlins Canada headquarters) service center and they can help as well. They can also point you where to buy shock springs.

Based only on your weight, no idea the way you plan to ride (street only, track only, combination, you like a firm or softer ride, bad roads, etc.) but I’d put you in a 9.0 fork spring. The shock spring rate should be a 90, 95, 100, 110 and not the same decimal point as the front, that may help you find it. I’m surprised you have a 10.0 front and 95 rear, that may be right for the RR but I’d say for a 10.0 front I’d expect a 100 or 105 shock but again, I’m guessing and I am fat so I usually have a 105 or 110. Your 95 shock spring might be right on is what I’m saying.

My only other advice to you is two fold: use the Ohlins oil, seals and fluids when rebuilding and setting things up and with Ohlins I would always error on the side of softer because they usually spec slightly firmer springs. So if you are between a 9.0 and 9.5 fork spring go 9.0 or do one 9.0 and one 9.5 spring for an effective 9.25 rate. I’m running .95 springs in my Ohlins forks on my Ducati and it’s basically perfect even though I should be a 10.0 or even a 10.5.

And make sure they get serviced if you don’t know the last time it’s been done, Ohlins stuff needs constant refreshing to work well, like every 2 years.
I failed to mention that this a track bike no headlight, mirrors, tailights
I bought this from a guy weighing 200 lbs

If i had to categorize myself i would be at slow expert on my ninja 300 track bike
this would be my first 600cc track bike i had 600cc before but never on a track

I tried to email the ohlins service here in canada edmonton but have not heard back the guy servicing my bike is not an actual ohlins service center but he has worked with alot of suspension BUT he most does dirt bikes as he does not want to deal with the mess of a superbike i called him and said he could refresh them no problems but wouldnt know the proper sag or springs for them

Ill try to find other service centers here if i can just thought ill go here and atleast get some spring rate chart
 

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I failed to mention that this a track bike no headlight, mirrors, tailights
I bought this from a guy weighing 200 lbs

If i had to categorize myself i would be at slow expert on my ninja 300 track bike
this would be my first 600cc track bike i had 600cc before but never on a track

I tried to email the ohlins service here in canada edmonton but have not heard back the guy servicing my bike is not an actual ohlins service center but he has worked with alot of suspension BUT he most does dirt bikes as he does not want to deal with the mess of a superbike i called him and said he could refresh them no problems but wouldnt know the proper sag or springs for them

Ill try to find other service centers here if i can just thought ill go here and atleast get some spring rate chart
Call Ohlins USA and ask them. They’ll be happy to help.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Call Ohlins USA and ask them. They’ll be happy to help.
i emailed them and they're recommendation based solely on my weight was 9.5 front are rear

ill try to run what i have right now which is 10front 9.5 back could probably get away with fine tuning the suspension
 

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i emailed them and they're recommendation based solely on my weight was 9.5 front are rear

ill try to run what i have right now which is 10front 9.5 back could probably get away with fine tuning the suspension
I thought the 95 rear might be in the ballpark but the 9.5 front seems a bit high unless your track is glass smooth. Which is not unusual they recommend a tick high on rate, I mentioned that in my original post.

So here’s what I’d do: buy a single 9.0 spring (Ohlins sells their springs separately) and install it in one leg effectively giving you a 9.5 rate (10.0 in one, 9.0 in the other, averages to 9.5). If it’s too harsh still then swap the other one to either a other 9.0 (or a 9.5 giving you a 9.25).
 

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Miweber that I agree is a move in the proper direction.
Be a shame to fudge settings on those primo units. For me that's leaving too much on the table in terms of grip, tire wear, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Miweber that I agree is a move in the proper direction.
Be a shame to fudge settings on those primo units. For me that's leaving too much on the table in terms of grip, tire wear, etc.
are referreing to the different springs in the fork?

on topic:
I want to change the springs but funds are a little low this year between getting the bike buying new tires, warmers, sprocket n chain set
 

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If funds are low just play with the preload & oil level in the forks, less preload & lowering the oil level will make the forks run a bit softer. I'm 62kg (136lb) & I run 10.4 fork springs & 10.5 shock spring on my 03 600RR track bike. I brake quite hard especially when I play with 1000's on the track, fork travel indicator show I still have about 15mm left, with 9.5 fork springs it's almost bottomed out & occasionally lifting the rear wheel.

I prefer having a stiffer spring with less preload for track use than with softer springs with a lot of preload. It's about initial suspension movement, more preload means it takes more force for the suspension to start moving. My bike actually tracks better over bumpy surfaces with this set up, you should try it.
 

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are referreing to the different springs in the fork?

on topic:
I want to change the springs but funds are a little low this year between getting the bike buying new tires, warmers, sprocket n chain set
Forgive me for saying this but if funds are low to the point you can’t afford a $100 spring and a $100 install I don’t think track riding is a good thing for you to be doing then. Not sure if you’re racing or doing track days but as someone who’s done both neither are inexpensive activities; tires alone on a 600 are $300 an event, not to mention other incidentals. You can get several track days on a set of tires for a 300 because there is not a lot of power to those bikes but you’ll chew through rears quite often on a 600 if you’re a “slow expert“ level as you stated above. You’re looking at over 3x the power on basically the same weight bike.

If you’re going to go through playing with the oil level like @OveRReV mentioned you might as well swap in the correct spring. I’m not saying what he says is wrong with regards to spring rate but his spring specs are high even for me at 240lbs so I can’t imagine that bike for him at under 140lbs on a bumpy track……..what he’s running is close to what is speced out to be running on my 650lb sport tourer, two up, fully with packed luggage.
 
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are referreing to the different springs in the fork?

on topic:
I want to change the springs but funds are a little low this year between getting the bike buying new tires, warmers, sprocket n chain set
I think having the additional .90 spring in your kit is a good thing, if of course the 1.0 doesn't work out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Forgive me for saying this but if funds are low to the point you can’t afford a $100 spring and a $100 install I don’t think track riding is a good thing for you to be doing then. Not sure if you’re racing or doing track days but as someone who’s done both neither are inexpensive activities; tires alone on a 600 are $300 an event, not to mention other incidentals. You can get several track days on a set of tires for a 300 because there is not a lot of power to those bikes but you’ll chew through rears quite often on a 600 if you’re a “slow expert“ level as you stated above. You’re looking at over 3x the power on basically the same weight bike.

If you’re going to go through playing with the oil level like @OveRReV mentioned you might as well swap in the correct spring. I’m not saying what he says is wrong with regards to spring rate but his spring specs are high even for me at 240lbs so I can’t imagine that bike for him at under 140lbs on a bumpy track……..what he’s running is close to what is speced out to be running on my 650lb sport tourer, two up, fully with packed luggage.
funds are low because i have spent alot on the ninja300 which is my main weapon for track days with friends
i had a duke 690 for the street that was unused for the entire year of 2021

i bought the cbr600 not to replace my ninja 300 but to replace my duke 690 and resigning myself from the street the

The cbr600 would only see little use so i think i dont need to worry about its tires too much there is a new track opening here near calgary this year RMM and thats where i would really use it

all my friends are riding rc390, r3 and duke 390 so its more fun for me on the ninja300 although im down on power with them

anyway i appreiciate everyones input here the cbr600 seems like its leaking abit oil from the fork seals i have it inspect it carefully and if i do get them serviced might buy a 9.25/9.5 spring


EDIT: Ill just try it as it this year if the forks are not leaking and see how i like them
 

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anyway i appreiciate everyones input here the cbr600 seems like its leaking abit oil from the fork seals i have it inspect it carefully and if i do get them serviced might buy a 9.25/9.5 spring
Get a single 9.0 spring. That will give you an effective 9.5 rate.
 
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