Honda CBR 600RR Forum banner

1 - 20 of 57 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm currently shopping for a 2013+ CBR600RR. I've read reviews but they don't say much about the C-ABS other than it works. One said it is "weird on the track until you get used to it," but "shouldn't have any impact on lap times."

My first bike was a 2011 CBR250R, of course without ABS. I've put around 5000 miles on it. Never dropped it, but certainly had some educational close-calls.

I'm leaning towards C-ABS because I have been involved with a handful of cases where the @#$!(s) abruptly slammed on their brakes, the rear tire went wobbly, possibly detached from the asphalt, and I've slid. I know, I know, pump the brakes (I have a swapped CRX without ABS), and maybe more controlled practice would help -- but when the vehicle in front of you is suddenly sliding to a stop, pumping the brakes is not at the forefront of my mind.


Are there any negative aspects to ABS other than increased complexity?

While I'm at it -- are there any changes between the 2013 CBR600RR and a 2014-2016? From what I can tell, no, but want to make sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,362 Posts
I have ABS on my new bike, and love it. I also leave enough room between me and the car ahead of me that I shouldn't need it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
What TheX said. Only time someone slamming their breaks in front of you will affect you is if

1. You aren't paying attention in front of you
2. You are following too close.
 

·
BOTM Winner 02/15
Joined
·
237 Posts
The only negative aspect of ABS is that it takes a lot longer to bleed the system. It adds a lot of safety IMO, ABS could have saved me from laying down my bike once when I blocked my front wheel because the truck in front me me decided to make a emergency full stop on the highway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I asked for opinions on ABS, not on my driving :)

I've never rear-ended anything, thus I have a good grasp of proper braking. I commute roughly 30k miles a year only counting my driving to work, have been working 15 years, and have not had an at-fault accident. My commute, state-side, is primarily on 65-70mph stretches of highway. Of course, this means average speed is 70-80mph.

Leaving plenty of space to stop at 70-80mph on a highway during rush hour means the person behind you is tailgating, pissed, and will likely make a risky maneuver to get around you. The gap you leave in front will be promptly filled by someone else that cares more about moving through traffic than whether you have enough stopping space. In short, you CAN'T have plentiful space in front of you at those speeds or you aren't going to go anywhere because people will always fill that gap. You're a fortunate person if you live somewhere in which traffic responds differently.

Before leaving the country, I almost lost my 2008 AP2 to this. I was cruising at the 75mph my lane was traveling, saw a row of taillights turn red in front of me, braked, and watched as the GTi behind me slid by in the grass median and the car behind him stopped within a couple feet from my rear bumper. I gave the GTi owner a huge thanks, thumbs up, let him back on the road, and continued home. I'd love to live in a world where everyone leaves enough space -- but I don't get to make that decision in rush-hour traffic.

Back to the point of this thread, which is "are there down-sides to ABS." I've verified the title is "Opinions on C-ABS" and not "Opinions on my driving."

Thank you, TheX for giving your input on C-ABS.

Thanks to Cyntax as well -- I spent a little time in Amsterdam last time I went on leave. The more-bikes-than-cars thing was a bit of a culture shock. I plan to go back at some point. Cannibale Royale had some awesome burgers.
 

·
BOTM Winner Jan 2015
Joined
·
1,960 Posts
I asked for opinions on ABS, not on my driving :)







Leaving plenty of space to stop at 70-80mph on a highway during rush hour means the person behind you is tailgating, pissed, and will likely make a risky maneuver to get around you. The gap you leave in front will be promptly filled by someone else that cares more about moving through traffic than whether you have enough stopping space. In short, you CAN'T have plentiful space in front of you at those speeds or you aren't going to go anywhere because people will always fill that gap. You're a fortunate person if you live somewhere in which traffic responds differently.

Having driven professionally for 4 years on busy highways and interstates, in which route times determined my job performance, you are wildly inaccurate. I was one of the top drivers at my branch and I can assure you that you can leave enough room in front of you. If someone gets in front of you to "fill the space" back off some more. You can still go at the full speed of traffic flow and leave adequate space in front of you.


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Having driven professionally for 4 years on busy highways and interstates, in which route times determined my job performance, you are wildly inaccurate. I was one of the top drivers at my branch and I can assure you that you can leave enough room in front of you. If someone gets in front of you to "fill the space" back off some more. You can still go at the full speed of traffic flow and leave adequate space in front of you.
If I tell you "sure," can we get the thread back on topic?

If two people are traveling at 70mph, to keep the same distance you will need to maintain 70mph. If someone forces their way into the gap, to regain that distance you will need to slow down. If another person moves into that gap, you will need to slow down further. It's not rocket science.

Let me reiterate, yet again -- I have never rear-ended anything. I'm not asking for advice on proper distance. I have managed to figure that out on my own.

Let's try this again: I'm asking about ABS.
 

·
05/16 BOTM Winner / Pocketbike Racer
Joined
·
342 Posts
ABS is great for commuting and city driving. When you get into more spirited street and track riding you'll lose the need for ABS. The ABS system leaves a bit of disconnect of feel when you brake really hard, and at times the lever loses all pressure and goes to the grip in certain situations. Im currently removing the ABS system on my bike because i hardly use the bike to commute anymore and am focusing more on track riding. You need to determine what your going to do most. I highly recommend ABS for normal commuting and wet weather riding but for track, I'd say no.
 

·
BOTM Winner Jan 2015
Joined
·
1,960 Posts
If I tell you "sure," can we get the thread back on topic?

If two people are traveling at 70mph, to keep the same distance you will need to maintain 70mph. If someone forces their way into the gap, to regain that distance you will need to slow down. If another person moves into that gap, you will need to slow down further. It's not rocket science.

Let me reiterate, yet again -- I have never rear-ended anything. I'm not asking for advice on proper distance. I have managed to figure that out on my own.

Let's try this again: I'm asking about ABS.

You can tell me whatever you want to but your only making yourself look bad by creating excuses for poor driving habits.

In most cases, the cars that get in front of you to fill the space will change lanes and move on, since their objective is to move faster than the flow of traffic. So unless your goal is to do the same as them, it's a non issue.

I rode the 250R for a couple of years and I know the limits of it. It's not bike to ride close to people with since its braking power is significantly lower than the 600RR

ABS is a great tool, however it's not a substitute for not knowing proper braking technique.


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
ABS is great for commuting and city driving. When you get into more spirited street and track riding you'll lose the need for ABS. The ABS system leaves a bit of disconnect of feel when you brake really hard, and at times the lever loses all pressure and goes to the grip in certain situations. Im currently removing the ABS system on my bike because i hardly use the bike to commute anymore and am focusing more on track riding. You need to determine what your going to do most. I highly recommend ABS for normal commuting and wet weather riding but for track, I'd say no.
Thank you.

Slowly my faith is being restored that there are people here with reading comprehension.

I've read that ABS can be disabled by removing the fuse and it'll function as a non-ABS bike.

Will definitely do more commuting than track.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
You can tell me whatever you want to but your only making yourself look bad by creating excuses for poor driving habits.

In most cases, the cars that get in front of you to fill the space will change lanes and move on, since their objective is to move faster than the flow of traffic. So unless your goal is to do the same as them, it's a non issue.

I rode the 250R for a couple of years and I know the limits of it. It's not bike to ride close to people with since its braking power is significantly lower than the 600RR

ABS is a great tool, however it's not a substitute for not knowing proper braking technique.
I've driven hundreds of thousands of miles in multiple countries in multiple vehicle types on a variety of surfaces in a variety of conditions in cities and the country and have not had an accident. I'll take your opinion of my driving seriously when you've actually witnessed it, until then please remove yourself from the thread unless you can tell me downsides of ABS on this bike.

I don't care if I "look bad" to someone that derives an opinion on my driving from a short blurb in a forum. People that draw conclusions based on that alone aren't people I lose sleep over.

For the third, fourth, fifth (?) time -- ABS?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,759 Posts
Hey Jorsher, for what it's worth, I think you've got the right idea. Never mind the banal commentary about safe following distances, blah, blah, blah. The fact is, not everything can be predicted and ABS can save you at some point.

In the city, road surfaces can change (from asphalt to cobblestone to slippery paint on the road to tram tracks) or you can find junk on the road; other times, people do things that nobody would expect so having ABS will allow you to make full use of the brakes even without being completely ready.

I've never had an accident and appreciated the C-ABS on my '09. I can't say it ever saved me, but coming out of one hairpin on a mountain one day, I found it covered in gravel left when somebody pulled away too hard in a car that must have been parked to see the view over the edge. I was happy I didn't have to spend that split-second to consider how much brake to apply in those conditions. There were a couple of other times I was glad to have it; I would've been able to brake fine with a regular system, but the ABS gives you more margin for error.

It adds weight to the bike and maintenance work can increase. I guess you have to ask yourself, is your life worth $1000 (or whatever it is where you are) or not? From what I've seen here, a lot of riders on this site spend time railing against ABS to convince themselves of their skills, but not all of us buy into it. It's the InterWeb after all so take it with a grain of salt and do what's best for you.
 

·
BOTM Winner Jan 2015
Joined
·
1,960 Posts
Yup, I dislike them too.

Surely you aren't ignorant enough to call me one? You're making yourself look bad if you do.

I told you about ABS, it's a great tool, but not a substitute for improper braking. If your locking your back tire up and your first thought when doing an emergency brake isn't the proper one, then you don't have as much experience as you give yourself credit for, good sir.

Get ABS, if it saves you once, it's worth it. It's that easy.

However, what I'm saying is that I know the bike you're riding currently very well, not doubting that you don't, but it's not a bike to ride close to people on and as I stated above, unless you're going faster than the flow, leaving space (even in rush hour) isn't an issue and is a necessity to stay safe, and ABS isn't a loophole to that no matter what bike. Just stressing the importance of giving yourself room (yes I know, "I've never rear ended anyone") but if your locking your rear tire up your most likely too close. Welcome to the forum, mate.


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
What a much more helpful and pleasant response.

I've locked up the rear tire due to panic/surprise. At that speed when the car in front of me suddenly lights up the tails and the rear end lifts due to the sudden stop, it gets that reaction out of me. Following "too closely" I would have hit them, especially if I was locking up the tire, right? I'm considering ABS because as much as I'd like to tell myself I'll never panic and will always brake properly, I also know that it's a lot easier to say while I'm sitting at my desk.

Definitely don't think I fit the squid stereotype as someone that started with a couple years on a 250 and wore proper gear all the time :p

Thanks, Maaku.

My biggest concern was how much it impedes "fun." I've not needed it yet, but there have been things that have made me think it could be worth the premium. I've seen similar responses to traction control on S2K forums, but after seeing how most of the wrecked ones were AP1s without I decided to pay the premium. At times it's annoying, but has saved my rear a couple times as well.

The unexpected happens, and it doesn't sound like it is too much of a hindrance. Knowing it can be disabled or removed later, I'll pay the price and opt for it. "I'd rather have it and not need it, then need it and not have it."

Thanks
 

·
BOTM Winner Jan 2015
Joined
·
1,960 Posts
Definitely don't think I fit the squid stereotype as someone that started with a couple years on a 250 and wore proper gear all the time :p





Thanks

Just poking at you man. If you have the option. There is no reason not to get ABS unless you're going to track the bike. Which even if you're going to track a couple times a year, it's not going to impede you having a blast.


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
874 Posts
ABS is a nice feature to have.... Definitely save your a$$. Only cons I can think of is that it adds something like 20lbs (which is A LOT), it costs more, and maintenance is a little bit more difficult... I'd say if you can get it then do it though, weight will be not even be noticeable and the maintenance is not that much worse.
 
1 - 20 of 57 Posts
Top