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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I've been riding for a little over a year now, 10k+ miles... I'm no expert or anything, but I can keep up with my friends. I rode a ninja 500, and now I've moved on to the CBR600rr '06

I ride safely, not really getting tooo close to my limit.

We go riding quite a bit, and I've never really been sure as to HOW to know what the right LINE through a turn is. I want to be able to take handle corners very well. I don't care about top speed, I care about rhythm and quickness.


Is there any resource you guys know of to fill me in?

I want to get quicker, I want to get better... I'll be safe, but I want to get good.

I know I can go to a track and practice there, but realistically it's too impractical.

Any and ALL suggestions will be appreciated.
 

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I guess you 2nd from last line blew it for me. I do have a street bike, but I tend not ot go squiding it up on the street and screwing around. That's when you or someones else gets hurt, but that's just me.

I'd say take a race school. Plenty of good ones out there. Schwantz, Star, Keith Code, etc. If you're going to fall, better to do it there rather than have your bike slide into a car or friend.
 

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If you are going to be riding on the street, then the only proper line is the one that will keep you safe. If you are riding the twisties, make sure you are not too close to the double yellow lines. Even if you are still on your side of the road, your body and head might be across the other lane.

You should not be worried about the fastest lines on the street; that will just increase your chances of getting killed. The bottom line is if you want to get truly fast, you need to take it to the track!

I hope you take this advice to heart.
 

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Disco said:
If you are going to be riding on the street, then the only proper line is the one that will keep you safe. If you are riding the twisties, make sure you are not too close to the double yellow lines. Even if you are still on your side of the road, your body and head might be across the other lane.

You should not be worried about the fastest lines on the street; that will just increase your chances of getting killed. The bottom line is if you want to get truly fast, you need to take it to the track!

I hope you take this advice to heart.
I agree with disco. You have o get to a track man. On the street there really isn't that much of a line. You need to learn how to find one on a track, then that will make it easier to find one on the street. Anie up the dough and get to a track school. It will be well worth the time and money spent.
 

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Take it to the track and you will learn how much there is to learn about riding a motorcycle. The street simply does not compare.
 

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go to a track and learn from watching other guys. my line is quiet weird, totally mine in a race which gives me an edge plus i work really hard on late braking all the other "trackday is once a month guys". if your worried about being quick, dont, it WILL COME ON THE TRACK. i might not post on this form about my track bikes or have pics with my number, but ill tell u this, get to a track and free your mind. let the bike do its thing.. screw what any1 else tells u unless it evolves your safety.

as for the street, take your time. thats the best line. if u can keep up u can pass is how i live on the track but on the street, just enjoy the ride.
 

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Totally agree with what everyone here has said. The street is indeed no place to try to push your limits. You say you don't exceed your limits, but until you do, you never know what your limits are. Make any sense? The track is the ONLY place you will learn a thing about being fast. You will learn more in one DAY on the track than you will in a whole YEAR of riding twisties and trying to keep up with your buddies. Just my $.02, ride safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the answers guys.

I hope I didn't make it sound Like i'm a complete jackass. I don't ride "fast" at all on the "street."

I follow the normal rules of the road, when it comes to ANY place around traffic. I took the safety course, and have always been a defensive driver. I really don't open up unless I feel that the area is safe.... much like the rest of you.

I don't know if any of you are familiar with my area (san luis obispo), but there are MANY roads that are just in the middle of nowhere, and no cars around. Don't get me wrong, I COMPLETELY understand that i should still be careful on those roads, and I am... I KNOW i'm not pushing my self or the bike. I make it a point to stay on my side of the road, and I don't go balls out in blind corners...
I don't want to die as much as the next guy.

I guess I just wanted to improve because to my knowledge there are not any tracks even CLOSE to where I live. THe closest is about 2 hrs + away. It just seems like that's the slowest way to get better. I'm not trying to knee drag or anything, just improve as a rider... that's all.

I understand everyone's points though, and thank you all for trying to keep me safe. That's an awesome attitude, and I do appreciate it.

The street is not the place to try to get better. I will take that to heart. I plan on sticking on this forum for a while, so I don't want any of you thinking I'm too retarded. At least not YET. :)

How about this question in it's stead....

ARe there any books / videos that you guys would recommend to teach the theory better?
 

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Going to the track the slowest way to get better?!?!??!

very much the opposite! You will have a new appriciation for riding your bike the way it was designed ... in a "safe" enviroment too. 2+ hours to the track is nothing, I travel 3 hours each way 10+ times a year to my local track. You get to ride the same set of turns all day long and figure out how to take them better, smoother and eventually faster.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
okay,

so I'll go to the next track day I can... you guys convinced me.

But... once I get there, do I just look at what others do?

This overwhelming push to go to the track, HAS convinced me to go to the next track day.
 

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Imonstrous said:
okay,

so I'll go to the next track day I can... you guys convinced me.

But... once I get there, do I just look at what others do?

This overwhelming push to go to the track, HAS convinced me to go to the next track day.
Get behind someone slightly faster than you and try to shadow them but don't push too hard because they have a certain smoothness that you will be lacking or talk to an instructor.
 

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bro, u sound scared.. r u scared? that was what some1 told me my first time.. i laughed and said helllllll yeah!

that just means go and let go. turn off your brain and listen to the bike. plus im sure most tracks have a first time group, slow group and a fast group. i spent 2 laps on the slow group.. man was i flyin! n e ways.. look up the nearest tracks website and learn up. have fun.
 

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Nor Cal REDD SLEDD said:
If you want a GREAT read try " Sport Riding Techniques " it not only gives great info on how ride on the track but gives you some good street lesson's also.
+1, i have it as well, author is Nick Ienatsch just in case you want to find & buy it, written quite well & very easy to understand unless you're a total idiot LOL (joke). read the book several times before i did my first trackday (on my CBR, i had some prior racing experience but it's all me though, no instructors).

Twist of the Wrist II by Keith Code is also a good read, a bit on the techy side, it teaches you the finer points of steering, throttle etc. etc. but also a must have if you're serious on improving yourself.

btw here's a couple of my trackday videos, i hope this convinces you it's the best & quickest way to learn & hone your skills so you can be a better street rider, most of all i had the time of my life, you'll cherish every minute of it.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=4749897815946912506
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=8898467580668470929
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I have flick of the wrist II, not the other book. I'll look into it.

Thanks for the input guys. I really do appreciate the advice.

How many trips to the track did it take you guys to NOTICE an improvement? (I know it's different for everybody... but it'd still be interesting to know).
 

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Imonstrous said:
I have flick of the wrist II, not the other book. I'll look into it.

Thanks for the input guys. I really do appreciate the advice.

How many trips to the track did it take you guys to NOTICE an improvement? (I know it's different for everybody... but it'd still be interesting to know).

First time ever!! I immediatly noticed a huge improvement and found myself appling it during everyday riding afterwards.
 

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^^^^^^ +100, if you didn't get way much better after your first trackday then something must be wrong with either you or the instructor & you should immediately give up riding for eternity (joke on the last part) :D , seriously though it's a big + on your skill level, my times improved by 15seconds from what i started out with but there's still a few more things i need to do to go quicker & better.
 

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You can learn more in a single trackday than you can in an entire season of riding. Honestly.

You may even get hooked on them so much that street riding seems pointless. (It happened to me, and I am not alone in this.)

2 hours to your nearest track eh? You know, we're lucky to live in California and have a multitude of road courses that are 2-4 hours away. There are track junkies in other parts of the country that have to drive 8+ hours to their nearest course.
 

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^^^^x10, I barely started doing track days this year, just came back from the latest one this saturday at Arroyo Seco, and I gotta tell you, riding the street just doesnt measure up anymore, I too learned more on my first track day than in the 16 years that I have been riding. 2 hr drive is a very small price to pay to go to a track. Books are good for general knowledge, but nothing beats practice. Go to the track and I guarantee you that you will not be disapointed. Let us know how it goes.
 
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