Honda CBR 600RR Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,070 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I hate to ask such a seemingly dumb question, but what exactly makes a radial mounted caliper so much different, and why is it so much better? I assume it is mounted somewhat differently than a regular caliper, but how. I've tried looking at different pics, but I'm not really getting anywhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
Radial mounted calipers reduce the amount of flex, or "give", under heavy braking forces. This allows the rider more feel under such extreme use. They are so called as the caliper mounting points are in a radial line with respect to the wheel spindle, and therefore the centre of rotation of the disc. This arrangement means that radial set ups require an entirely new fork bottom arrangement for the caliper mounting points.

For street use, you will feel no difference. If you want to increase "feel" try braided hoses, change of pad material, change of disc etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
638 Posts
westhondapons600rr, thanks for the great explanation . Thats what I suspected was the main benefit. I read something about heat being distributed more evenly on the brake pads of radials too..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
730 Posts
westhondapons600rr said:
For street use, you will feel no difference. If you want to increase "feel" try braided hoses, change of pad material, change of disc etc.
Don't forget the biggest upgrade you can do in regard to clamping force of the brakes, which is an upgraded master cylinder such as Brembo.

Stainless steel lines and different rotors keep the brakes from fading after repeated use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
westhondapons600rr, thanks for the great explanation . Thats what I suspected was the main benefit. I read something about heat being distributed more evenly on the brake pads of radials too..
Thanks man. The other benefit is that the forces through the mounting points are much easier to predict. As the rotor spins, it will try to pull the caliper round with it. This results in mainly (but not exclusively) compressive forces in the upper mount, and tensile forces in the lower. Because the forces are more discrete than in a connventional mount, a more rigid system can be engineered.

Heat transfer is a product of pad material, rotor and caliper size, rather than mounting type.

Don't forget the biggest upgrade you can do in regard to clamping force of the brakes, which is an upgraded master cylinder such as Brembo.
Better than that is simply to change to braided lines, with a finer bore. The steel hose will not flex under increased pressure, and the narrower bore allows more pressure to be exerted on the pistons for a given amount of lever travel. (Pressure is force per unit AREA- less area=greater force). I know, I have braided lines, supersport pads, wave discs and a Brembo master cylinder.

Worth bearing in mind that the reigning British Supersport champion, Karl Harris of Honda, uses stock discs and calipers, as he believes no further improvement is required!
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top