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Okay, so rear brake has about 30% of the braking power...but you should use all this since it may lock up and your bike will wash out if you don't modulate it.

So the question is, why don't they make the rear brake less powerful so the rear doesn't lock up when you jam on it (panic situation or as such).
 

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I have trouble locking mine up! I only do it to skid to a stop sometimes but I've never locked my front or rear in a panic or by accident. Be gentle on them.
 

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Okay, so rear brake has about 30% of the braking power...but you should use all this since it may lock up and your bike will wash out if you don't modulate it.

So the question is, why don't they make the rear brake less powerful so the rear doesn't lock up when you jam on it (panic situation or as such).
actually it take less force to lock it up than griping the tire. rolling resistance is bigger than skiding resisitance.
 

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Okay, so rear brake has about 30% of the braking power...but you should use all this since it may lock up and your bike will wash out if you don't modulate it.

So the question is, why don't they make the rear brake less powerful so the rear doesn't lock up when you jam on it (panic situation or as such).
A panic situation on a sport bike is going to put almost all of the weight on the front tire. This means that there is little force keeping the back tire rolling instead of skidding. In other words, nakes it easy as hell to lock up.
 

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So the question is, why don't they make the rear brake less powerful so the rear doesn't lock up when you jam on it (panic situation or as such).
Practice your panic stops, and you will not, "Jam it on" to begin with. The rear is much less powerful than the front. Just look at the size of the rotor and caliper. Find a nice empty parking lot or office park and practice stopping, first at low speed, and gradually increasing your speed. It is better to make mistakes and learn in a controlled environment than in a true emergency situation.
 

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Practice your panic stops, and you will not, "Jam it on" to begin with. The rear is much less powerful than the front. Just look at the size of the rotor and caliper. Find a nice empty parking lot or office park and practice stopping, first at low speed, and gradually increasing your speed. It is better to make mistakes and learn in a controlled environment than in a true emergency situation.
Well said. One of the biggest points MSF covers. I'd rather lock my rear than front anytime of day. You lock and tuck that front end. KYSAGB!!
 

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this has nothing to do with the rear brake being powerful. its the front brakes that are so powerful that it takes all weight off the rear tire so the rear brake just locks up the whole tire. tip is to just use the front thats all thats needed.
 

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Well said. One of the biggest points MSF covers. I'd rather lock my rear than front anytime of day. You lock and tuck that front end. KYSAGB!!
Exactly! And if you still think it's too powerful after some practice, then maybe riding bikes isn't for you.
 

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30% of the stopping power when everything is going right.. IE when you are slowing down for a stoplight. 0% of the stopping power when you lift the rear tire under hard braking.

Honda already dumbed the rear brake enough. Dont mash on it and you'll be fine. I dont even use the thing.
 

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It's called taper braking. Initially, yes, the rear brakes may provide 25 percent of the stoping power, but, that is initially. You must slowly release the rear brake as the weight is shifted forward, and, you begin squeezing the front brake more. At full stopping power, the rear may be very very slightlly off the ground, or maybe giving you 0 to 5 percent of your total braking. All I know is that when you use the front to it's limit, the rear brake provides very little of the total braking.

THere are very few cases when you want to use the rear anywhere near the old 75, 25 percent rule. Some of those cases would be up hill, and in the rain or on slippery surfaces. Otherwise, you could maybe initially start using the rear brake, but you will taper off it as you apply more front break.

Here is a nice informative link:
http://www.markhodson.com/text/brktxt.htm

An ideal stop goes something like this:

You apply both brakes gradually and with almost equal force for the
first phase of your braking.
The weight will transfer forwards as the front suspension compresses,
and your arms bend.

There's now more weight on the front (up to 100% if you're braking at 1g
- and modern road bikes can brake at up to 1.2g).

You now let off most - or all - of the rear brake and increase pressure
on the front, which now has most or all of the grip. This middle phase
of braking can be 100%:0% - if it is less than 85% Front, you probably
aren't braking near your bike's limits.

The bike slows and the forces you are exerting through the brakes and
tyres diminish (the energy in the bike is proportional to the square of
your speed).

The front begins to rise back up on its suspension.

[If it's an emergency, you now breath a sigh of relief and a small
prayer of thanks].

You taper off on the front brake - to prevent a slow speed lock up - and
increase the rear brake pressure once more.

Even stopping from 100mph, the last 5mph is slow riding, and you should
only use the rear brake for slow riding. So you do the final phase of
stopping 0% Front and 100% rear.

If you MUST quote a fixed apportionment of effort - I'd say it is
85%:15% - which is in line with the way Japanese 'bike designers set up
the brakes.
 

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I always use BOTH brakes in an emergency. Simultaneously and a firmly. I then feel when I can apply pressure to borderline locking. It comes in time. Now that I have more saddle time, I use only my rear brake when traffics tight. If im on the twisties I use my front to "drag" me in if I run wide. It becomes more and more natural in time.
 

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I usually use both brakes when stopping. However, I would be pressed to actually lock up the rear.

Maybe you could try a less aggressive brake pad compound in the rear?
 

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Nothing wrong with locking the rear. Just make sure you are up right as possible and steering straight if you let go. Otherwise don't panic. It'll be a long a55 skid!!
 

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The rear brake is there for a reason...

... and it should be used. Do I use it much at the racetrack? Nope, but I use the heck out of it at very slow speeds in parking lots. It keeps the bike stable at very slow speeds, (almost at a dead stop). It is also very useful at street speeds. You just have to develop a sensitivity to it so you don't lock it at the wrong time. No big deal. Practice makes perfect:toothy4:
 

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I read an article from a Euro magazine. Over 80% of Euro riders in a poll don't even touch their rear brake. All it takes is one "oopsy doosy" and you'll never forget when and how to use it!
 

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on a sportbike, the rear usually provides about 10% of braking force since the short wheelbase.
 

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I hardly believe the rear brake on this bike or any sport bike is 30% of the total stopping power. Maybe 10 or 15. If that.


Maybe a standard or a cruiser.


I don't even use my rear. Don't believe in it.
 
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