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Discussion Starter #1
Just seeing what you guys are running for gearing on your track bikes. I'm just looking for a good starting point. Thanks.
 

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15/43 or 15/45. 45 some people find good. I myself run 43 and love it.

Edit: Forgot to say. At my local track the fastest I get is around 240kmp/h which is top of 5th.
 

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Alright, thanks. I might split it and run 15/44. I did a little more research and that seems to be a popular with a street bike. Most people say at the track I will be doing track-days at this year (MAM) that 145mph is about the speed most 600's are getting to on the straight.
 

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The 15/45 is an outstanding combo. You will notice a considerable improvement of the drive out of corners without killing your top speed.

My first track day, an old timer told me -1/+3 is the perfect for any track in the US. It will be my next combo.
 

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I'm going to run 14/45 here in a few weeks. But that is on my 636, which was 15/43 stock
 

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I would not go down on the front of the 636. It will make the turn around the front sprocket very stressful for the chain. Personally I'd just go up 2 or 3 more teeth on the rear.
 

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I'm going to start with just the +2 on the rear, if I need more, I'll throw the -1 on.
 

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My 04 600 is track only. I have stock 15/43 and a 16. My question is at what point do I need a new chain? I have not changed any sprockets yet. Is it a pain? And do I need a new chain for each gear change. I would like to carry a couple different combo's. But not sure how hard to change said gears and or chain. Thanks for any info
 

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Bynum,

Again, I wouldn't go down AT ALL in the front. You're going to put a lot of stress on the chain with such a tight turning radius. Go up in the rear sprocket.

Richie,

Stock gearing is 16/43, not 15. Replace the chain if there's any tight or stretched spots. There's illustrations here showing what to look for. Search it. As long as you've got the right # of links in the chain, you can run different sprockets. Changing sprockets is easy too.
 

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Depends on your skill and what track your riding. I would worry more about getting your suspension dialed in then worrying about what gearing your running.
 

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15/46 on mine but we run mostly short twisty tracks
I installed a new chain cut slightly longer to compensate for the increase in sprocket teeth

Remember your axle position will change with some re-gearing combinations when using a stock length chain
It will change the way the bike handles (very slightly)

-1/+1 (15/44) will leave the axle in same position
Using 15/46 add one link to stock chain length (on your new chain) to compensate for the 2 extra teeth

also be advised when running an alloy rear sprocket you will be replacing it twice as often as a steel sprocket (alloy wears faster than steel)
I figure 2 alloy rears for every chain & steel front sprocket

Keep your chain & sprockets clean & lube'd to increase the life of the alloy rear sprocket.
Also rear wheel alignment is important.
A mis-aligned rear wheel will accelerate the wear on an alloy rear sprocket's teeth (the sides of the teeth)

(all this I had to learn the hard way - hope it saves you some time and $$$)
 
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