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Discussion Starter #1
I recently got an '03 954RR for the street, and have been stripping the street parts off the 600RR to make it a track-only bike. Turn signals, brake light, Fender eliminator, luggage racks, reflectors, chain guard are all gone. I have noticed in several still-shots of race bikes, that people remove the front sprocket cover.

Now I know there are certain reasons not to remove this (or for that matter, the chain guard) on a street bike, due to slinging oil/wax and getting laces caught.. but is there any reason I should put the front sprocket cover back on? I dont care about it getting dirty, since I'll have to clean it after each event anyways.. My main reasons are 1) less weight, 2) one less thing to have to take off to clean, 3) nowhere for gunk to just "build up".. and of course 4) looks better imho ;)

So has anyone else just removed this cover and ran w/o it on a track/race bike? Is there any reason I should *not* do this?
 

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For you viewing pleasure whilest waiting. (photo courtsy of Nando)

 

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Over the berm, and thru the woods, to grandmothers
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There is a chain guide that is part of the cover. If you remove the plastic piece the chain guide is like a metal "C" that guides through the middle of the chain. Make sure you bolt that peice back on. It will stop the chain from binding against the engine case if the chain comes loose or breaks. It could save you a lot of damage and money if that were to ever happen.

I ran mine like that for a while on my street bike for looks, but decided to put it back on to catch chain grime.
 

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That does look nice though
 

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Discussion Starter #5
flamedRRider said:
There is a chain guide that is part of the cover. If you remove the plastic piece the chain guide is like a metal "C" that guides through the middle of the chain. Make sure you bolt that peice back on. It will stop the chain from binding against the engine case if the chain comes loose or breaks. It could save you a lot of damage and money if that were to ever happen.

I ran mine like that for a while on my street bike for looks, but decided to put it back on to catch chain grime.
When you say chain guide, I immediately think of the plastic piece thats on the top of the front of the swingarm that the actual center of the chain guides over..

I assume you're talking about the metal "gasket-like" c-bracket that bolts on between the engine casing and the cover. If so, I will put that back on then.. Wasn't exactly sure if it served another purpose other than as a spacer.. guess u learn somethin every day..
 

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Now, this is where people give me the "evil" eye... because this is a one in a million shot but... should you crash and happen to catch your hand or arm or any part of you for that matter in there, it is going to suck badly. I took the one on the RR off because the shift linkage kind of prevents that, but I left the chain gaurd on. It weighs a few ounces and is more aerodynamic than the bare chain.
The only reason I ever thought of this is because I SAW it happen at Moroso in my second weekend ever. It was a little graphic and that stuff will stay with you. Just an idea to think about.
 
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