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Any tips from the pro's? I live in Oklahoma and it seems like lately it's been very windy (15-20mph). I'm a fairly new rider anyways but the wind really makes me uncomfortable when riding. I've tried changing positions a little but the wind shifts directions rather quick and the bike just kind of goes with it. What can I do to get some miles racked up on this thing?
 

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chodrick said:
Any tips from the pro's? I live in Oklahoma and it seems like lately it's been very windy (15-20mph). I'm a fairly new rider anyways but the wind really makes me uncomfortable when riding. I've tried changing positions a little but the wind shifts directions rather quick and the bike just kind of goes with it. What can I do to get some miles racked up on this thing?
15-20 is windy? Here in North Dakota it gusts better than 35 at least once a week.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Yea, the 15-20 is pretty steady. The gusts are way more than that but usually on days that I wouldn't consider 'riding weather' anyways. I may just have to brave it out and get use to it. It's not so bad while accelerating but at steady cruises it can blow me around pretty good.
 

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a good tuck will keep the gusts from blowing you around too much. other than that, just be comfortable w/ the bike flow w/ it...
 

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Take it from someone from Wyoming where windy days are as common as green grass...Ride on the side of the road that the wind is blowing from...i.e...

If the wind of blowing at your left side, stay to the left of the road. I say this because in wind gusts, you can and will be blow across the lane quite easily and if you stay on the far side of the lane, its going to give you a little bit of buffer to make up for any serious mistakes. If your on the highway and are going to pass a semi, be prepared as soon as you poke out past the nose of the thing to get blown around like crazy. Tucking doesnt really do squat unless its a headwind. Tailwinds are great though...i rode one time in about 40-50 MPH tailwind. Its weird doing 50 MPH and there not being any wind blowing against you at all.

You guys with your 15-20 MPH breezes...i cant think of the last time the wind was any calmer than that here!!
 

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Lean into the wind.
Hang on tight.
Stay on the side the wind is coming from.
Sometimes during mid turn u don't want to lean the bike too much incase of gusts.
 

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I'm no veteran rider but I've found that if I tuck in and and just make sure to have a good secure hold of the bike-it helps. Sometimes its easy to get "lazy" especially on long steady rides like on the interstate (which I try and avoid at all costs).
 

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Jeffro600 said:
Take it from someone from Wyoming where windy days are as common as green grass...Ride on the side of the road that the wind is blowing from...i.e...

If the wind of blowing at your left side, stay to the left of the road. I say this because in wind gusts, you can and will be blow across the lane quite easily and if you stay on the far side of the lane, its going to give you a little bit of buffer to make up for any serious mistakes. If your on the highway and are going to pass a semi, be prepared as soon as you poke out past the nose of the thing to get blown around like crazy. Tucking doesnt really do squat unless its a headwind. Tailwinds are great though...i rode one time in about 40-50 MPH tailwind. Its weird doing 50 MPH and there not being any wind blowing against you at all.

You guys with your 15-20 MPH breezes...i cant think of the last time the wind was any calmer than that here!!
I agree with everything except your advice on tucking in. Lowering your profile to the wind helps a lot. I drive across the Sunshine Skyway Bridge (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/buildingbig/wonder/structure/sunshine_skyway.html) quite often and tucking definetly helps to avoid being pushed around so much.
 

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NewRedRider said:
I agree with everything except your advice on tucking in. Lowering your profile to the wind helps a lot. I drive across the Sunshine Skyway Bridge (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/buildingbig/wonder/structure/sunshine_skyway.html) quite often and tucking definetly helps to avoid being pushed around so much.

If it helps you...great! Ive found that for me though, it doesnt do a darn thing when the wind is blowing to one of your sides...if its coming head on, it does make a difference.
 

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I agree that tucking helps even in a crosswind. It reduces the surface area that is subject to the wind. It doesn't eliminate it but it does help. The other thing to be careful of it the wind is usually much worse when driving over a bridge.
 

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tucking helps... i was riding last night with the tropical storm hovering around orlando, and i was getting beat up pretty badly. just tucked the whole way home...
 

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squeeze the tank with your tighs, that way if the wind rocks your body you dont translate it to the handlebars.
 

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Usually I wear a red cape :) lol

but sometimes I just tuck in.
 

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if it's a side wind , tucking won't help , ( the wind doesn't know how you're sitting ) , but staying loose on the bars will . just let it toss you a bit , it's part of riding .
 
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