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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Getting some riding school Variety: CSS, STAR, etc?

Ok, so quick and hopefully easy question.

I've already done 2 lvls of Cali Superbike School at the Streets and I'm signed up for lvl 3 next month. I'm considering backing out of the school next month and doing some plain track days to get more solo exp and to practice what I've already learned (I've only done 1 track day outside of CSS so far). Then, maybe i'll sign up for CSS at Laguna, Infineon, or Vegas to get some variety. While I'm at I figured it might be worth doing a different school for some perspective.

Here's my question: Should I stick with CSS and finish out all 4 levels or should I switch it up and do a day with STAR or a similar school?

K
 

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CSS is what I would recommend. Level III at least then more track days. After that it depends on what your goals are. If you don't know where you are going then you can wind up anywhere.
Since you started there, CSS is a good choice to finish basic schooling. Freddy Spencer is highly respected also.
My son has done I-IV with CSS (IV is what you want to work on) and each level I could see a large difference in his confidence, skill and lap times. I have sent him to other schools in between and they just weren't as good. They were local track day provider basic riding schools. He wants to race so he is signed up for CodeRace school in the fall, seemed like the right next step. He has run many track days since his first school in February and has show constant improvement in his lap times and his focus is shifting to working on what he recognises are his strength. The next level I guess. Who knows, maybe next year Freddy Spencer race school too, I have heard from people that took it that it is very good.

In CSS level III is about body position and movement on the bike. I consider it to be the basis for everything else you are going to do to go faster. If you are trying to gain general street and occasional trackday knowledge, you couldn't do much better.
 

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I wish I had a dad who would spoil me rotten with those bike mods AND be my mechanic.
:five:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the advice! Gonna stick with the class through lvl 3 and then start racking up a lot of solo track days after that with lvl 4 and CODE Race somewhere in the future.
 

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I wish I had a dad who would spoil me rotten with those bike mods AND be my mechanic.
:five:
No sweat. In two weeks when he turns 18 I am signing the pinks for the 600rr, truck, and trailer over to him. When I was 18 my father kicked my ass out the door. I didn't turn out so well. Maybe my son will have a chance to do something for himself now.
d
 

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Thanks for the advice! Gonna stick with the class through lvl 3 and then start racking up a lot of solo track days after that with lvl 4 and CODE Race somewhere in the future.
I don't think you can go wrong with that course. There are other good schools but I doubt there are any schools much better than CSS. Good group of guys/gals too. Misti Hurst and Josh Galster (instructors at CSS) are campagning in AMA Supersport this season as well as the teaching duties. These are some sharp riding coaches.
Good luck.
 

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No sweat. In two weeks when he turns 18 I am signing the pinks for the 600rr, truck, and trailer over to him. When I was 18 my father kicked my ass out the door. I didn't turn out so well. Maybe my son will have a chance to do something for himself now.
d
for insurance reasons, I'd keep the stuff in your name. As long as you both know the stuff is his, thats the most important part.

My father came from a poor coal mining family, so I know a bit of what you speak.
 

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quote=GraphiteBrawler;1771047]for insurance reasons, I'd keep the stuff in your name. As long as you both know the stuff is his, thats the most important part.

My father came from a poor coal mining family, so I know a bit of what you speak.[/quote]
The insurance is a consideration, I doubt they would charge any more in his name as he is the driver already (according to them).

Thanks for the understanding.:five:[
 

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Since you guys have been to CSS, if I sign up for the two day camps, at level will I end up? Level I, II or III?
If it is your first time then you take level I and level II. I have watched novices to experienced racers go through I/II course and almost all of them said it helped them ride better.
The camp sign up gives you the choice what levels you are taking. The cirriculum needs to be followed one after the other. Level I, Level II, Level III. They build on the previous level(s). Level IV is different in that the student picks the areas they wish to work on. The way they teach is methodical and builds in easy steps.
The thing I think that really works is the student is asked where and what is working for them and not working. Then the student works on that part in drills. Instructors on the track and the people running the track session knows who is doing which drills. Student to instructor ratio is low so you will definately get worked through it.
I haven't taken the courses but have watched my son take them. I can see the changes in technique and the speed on the track increase throughout the day. One of his friends came with us to a camp. The friend doesn't ride and when we watched, it was clear to his friend that his riding improved each session. He could see a difference too.
 

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If it is your first time then you take level I and level II. I have watched novices to experienced racers go through I/II course and almost all of them said it helped them ride better.
The camp sign up gives you the choice what levels you are taking. The cirriculum needs to be followed one after the other. Level I, Level II, Level III. They build on the previous level(s). Level IV is different in that the student picks the areas they wish to work on. The way they teach is methodical and builds in easy steps.
The thing I think that really works is the student is asked where and what is working for them and not working. Then the student works on that part in drills. Instructors on the track and the people running the track session knows who is doing which drills. Student to instructor ratio is low so you will definately get worked through it.
I haven't taken the courses but have watched my son take them. I can see the changes in technique and the speed on the track increase throughout the day. One of his friends came with us to a camp. The friend doesn't ride and when we watched, it was clear to his friend that his riding improved each session. He could see a difference too.
If I understood you correctly the two days will buy me level I?
 

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If I understood you correctly the two days will buy me level I?
Level I is the first day, level II is second day. The two days of a weekend is usually considered a camp. You can buy one day at a time but I wouldn't recommend it with level I/II, do both days.
 
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