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i've been reading/watching the keith code stuff, and just general sportriding techniques.. and practicing everyday.. have yet to goto a track..

but what advice or technique would you say helped you the most to become a better rider?..

i'd say looking through the turn helped me loads.. i was definitely one of those riding-the-front-of-the-bike-guys til i read something about it..

revmatching on downshifts was second nature because of car experience.. but is definitely a necessity..

and now reference points, and being conscious of my "mind's eye" and controlling it within my vision are what i'm focusing on now.. also learning to use the brake more, im a big engine braking guy and know that won't fly on the track but on the road it's hard to find spots where that's quasi-legally necessary :p

just wondering what advice or techniques i should look towards to get me where i wanna be i suppose.. cheers
 

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actually doing the stuff you read on the book on the track will make a better rider if you execute it as the author wants, practicing on the streets might be cheaper but it's much safer to do it on the track, i'm planning to head out next week for a long delayed trackday, i'm going to ride my tires off & do what i read on my books.
 

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The best advice I ever received about riding came from Aaron Stevenson of Cornerspeed. He stresses to everyone that takes his classes above anything else, BE SMOOTH! Smooth on the throttle, smooth off the throttle. Smooth on the brakes, smooth off the brakes. Smooth transitioning side to side. Practicing this will make you a more consistently good rider. If you are grabbing the throttle and wrenching it, the bike's geometry and handling will react in a negative way. If you grab a handful of front brake, you will definately see a result. Transitioning from left to right in a rough manner will cause the motorcycle to drift where you don't want it to. And don't drape your fingers over the front brake lever. You may not notice it, but if you are doing this, and find yourself in a situation that requires immediate throttle, your fingers have prob. already squeezed the brake lever at the wrong time. Ride safe.
 

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Yeah I think the Code stuff is great...very mental and detail
oriented but good. Book 2 is best.

I would say the most important thing is RELAX...
Especially your shoulders and elbows...
This will allow you to "read" your bike and the road.
The bike is designed to practically ride without you.
Most riders get in the way and muscle the thing...
Relax and give smooth inputs
and you and the bike will be happy.

Look at Dani Pederosa in Moto GP he's barely 140 pounds
and look what he does...
 

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600RidgeRunner said:
The best advice I ever received about riding came from Aaron Stevenson of Cornerspeed. He stresses to everyone that takes his classes above anything else, BE SMOOTH! Smooth on the throttle, smooth off the throttle. Smooth on the brakes, smooth off the brakes. Smooth transitioning side to side. Practicing this will make you a more consistently good rider. If you are grabbing the throttle and wrenching it, the bike's geometry and handling will react in a negative way. If you grab a handful of front brake, you will definately see a result. Transitioning from left to right in a rough manner will cause the motorcycle to drift where you don't want it to. And don't drape your fingers over the front brake lever. You may not notice it, but if you are doing this, and find yourself in a situation that requires immediate throttle, your fingers have prob. already squeezed the brake lever at the wrong time. Ride safe.
+1 smooth is fast
 

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Not quite sure what "helped" me, kind of just went to the track and was fast. I've now adjusted a lot of things since my first trackday last year. If you were to look at a picture from then and one from now you'd see a complete change. Sure I'm faster now but I'm also much smoother. I'm more relaxed also. Finding a style that's comfortable for you will make you a better rider. Staying relaxed and being as smooth as you can with all inputs is always something to remember.
 
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-Relax first
then
-Think

countersteering, loose in the arms, grip the tank with your legs, smooth throttle & brake, slide one but cheek off the seat in turns, no rear binder, bhlip the throttle on downshifts, clutchless upshifts, cover the clutch and brake w/ at least one or two fingers, learning to brake and gas with your right hand at the same time. 10% arms, 10% tank, 10% inside foot 70% outside foot weight distribution. Of course, look through the turn...
 

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+3 on the smooth. whatever you do, do it in a rhythm... you can start building your riding style after that, but work slowely within your rhythm... Thats the thing that has helped me the most. I've changed my riding style a lot by doing it a little at a time. The balls of the feet is one of the hardest things to do on the street for me because it's harder to shift from at first, and in an emergency stop you have to move your foot back onto the brake.
 
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