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So, I couldn't find any write ups on doing this, so I figured I'd tackle it and post it up for anyone interested.

Before I start, just fyi, this was done on a used first generation RS-5 I bought from someone on here, so I THINK it'll be just the same as the second generation can, but I can't promise that. Also, the typical "do this at your own risk, warranty goes bye bye, etc" applies. With that out of the way, here we go!

I'm not going to post up anything about tearing the can apart or putting it back together because that's covered by Yoshi on their website under "repacking". Go check it out.

So, first thing I did was mount the can on my bike stock so I could decide how much I wanted to take out. I have heard people do about 2 inches, but my main reason for cutting this was to make my Tripage IT as visible as possible, so I measured to where the LED's and diffuser start, which turns out where I need to cut about 3" out of it.


As you can see, the can is right at 12" long stock, so we'll be down to about 9" when all is said and done.


Next, I removed the can from the bike and got ready to work. You will need the following tools to accomplish this job; a dead blow hammer, a regular hammer, drill, drill lube of some sort (I used Boelube, but whatever you have should work), 3/16" drill bit, die grinder with a cutoff wheel, an 1/8" center punch, a rivet puller, safety glasses, and I recommend some gloves because these rivets get HOT.


Punch out the rivet stems and drill off the heads per Yoshi instructions. Remove end cap and end of can, again per their instruction. Next, drill off rivets at forward end of can (where the midpipe comes in) the same way and remove inside piece and attached baffle tube. Discard old packing (unless you want to reuse it, but to me this is the perfect time for a repack) being careful not to cut yourself on the wire mesh wrapped around the tube.


Now, measure in from the aft end of the tube and mark at whatever length you decided to cut off in the first step, 3" for me.



Cut along that line with your cutoff wheel, being careful not to let the cutoff wheel get away from you and tear up the wire mesh. Take your time, cut slow, and cut straight.



Here you can see about how much shorter the guts are now than they were/the can still is.


Next mark the outer sleeve at the same place, making sure to cut the forward end of it (otherwise you'll cut into the name plate obviously).
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Now cut that just like you did the inside tube, being EXTREMELY careful not to slip and damage the carbon fiber. Also, I forgot it in the tools picture, but I recommend a dust mask of some sort, as carbon fiber and resin dust can't be good for you.


Double check your lengths, and clean up/smooth out all freshly cut edges.


Now slip the tip cover over the freshly cut end of the outer sleeve and mark all hole locations. This end of the outer sleeve will now be your aft end. This is done so that the Yoshi name plate will not end up underneath the can clamp. Drill holes as marked. I recommend buying a drill bit made for carbon fiber. They're not cheap, but you can very easily go through 4 or 5 regular 100 degree bits trying to drill through carbon fiber. No joke, that **** does not **** around.


Slip the forward end cap and baffle tube into the outer sleeve noting correct end orientation. Install stainless steel band and rivets, then rivet forward end cap and outer sleeve together, then pack new packing material into can per instructions from Yoshi. I ASSUMED that I would have some left over because the repack kit has enough for a full sized can, but I must have packed it super tight because it turned out to be exactly enough. Just as a tip, I used a pair of needle nose vise grips to hold the wire mesh from unwrapping while I packed it since I had cut the tack welds off of the mesh. Also visible here, I took a pair of duck bills and rolled the freshly cut end of the baffle tube out just a bit to facilitate getting the inner end cap (aft end) installed as it slips inside of the baffle tube.



Install the aft end cap and verify hole alignment with outer can. You may need to elongate the holes in the outer sleeve a bit for proper alignment, just make sure that if you do, you're ONLY taking material out of the outer sleeve and not the cap. The cap and outer tip cover should be aligned just fine being that they were together initially. And same as before, use a bit made for carbon fiber or else be ready to replace your 3/16" bit.



You can see now that our overall length is right at 9".


Now rivet the end cap on. I know I showed a pair of manual rivet pullers in the tools photo, but that was because I assume most people don't have access to a pneumatic puller. If you DO, I would highly recommend using it because those stainless steel rivets are a BITCH to pull by hand!



As I said before, this was just how I did it. I'll be the first to say there is more than 1 way to kill a hooker, so feel free to try another way. I ASSUME this would work the same on a stainless or titanium one, but I don't know for sure obviously. ENJOY!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks everybody. It was pretty straight forward stuff, and hopefully this helps someone else out who is gunshy about doing it themselves.
 
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is there any reason that the "exhaust" is long ;

Now,that you have cut it,will it make any difference;
 

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is there any reason that the "exhaust" is long ;

Now,that you have cut it,will it make any difference;
No it won't. The only time when you will really get into some tuning issues with exhaust changes on an NA motor are when you start changing dynamic flow of the primary runners, aka your "header", and even then it's gotta take a big change to make problems for yourself. You can sometimes cause I bit of a lean issue if you make major changes where you remove a LARGE restriction from the exhaust, but even at that, with a fuel injected engine, especially one with a wideband oxygen sensor, which I THINK these bikes have, your ECU should be able to account for that slight increase in flow. Not only that, but unless you have installed an aftermarket header on the bike and eliminated the exhaust valve, then you don't need to worry about altering backpressure with a slip on because that is all regulated by the ECU controlling that valve.

As for changing the length and making a problem, you don't need to worry about it. The reason that the can is "too long" is that it's not economical for a company to make a separate, custom can for each application. Why do that if you can just make one can and then only have to make separate midpipes for that can to fit onto a particular bike? That can isn't too long for virtually any application it fits EXCEPT for our bikes, and even then, it's not like it's DRAMATICALLY too long for ours or anything. If you look at the internals of this can, you're not changing any amount of restriction when you shorten the can.
 

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I guess I'm the only one that likes the way the long exhaust looks?:dontknow:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
With the shortening, was the bike a lot louder, I run the BMC high flow filter and the RS-5, and I've noticed my bike is a lot louder than most other bikes already?


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Hey sorry, didn't notice that someone had replied here. I never ran the bike with the full length can on it so I can't say for sure how much louder it is. I ASSUME that it's louder than stock length, but it's by no means annoying or hard to deal with. I ride with a Sena SMH10 on my helmet and I didn't have to turn up the volume or anything like that to hear my music after I put it on, so it's pretty minimal.
 

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Awesome write up thanks for posting it in detail with pictures
 

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OP, Did you use the Yoshi repack kit or did you just source some generic repacking material and buy stainless rivets from a hardware store?
 

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I'll be doing around 2" to begin with and offering it up to the bike to see how it looks/fits and if it gives good enough visibility for the tail light. If it needs more off then I'll do it bit by bit if necessary. I'm not shortening for the 'stubby look' so will only remove the minimum amount required.


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