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Discussion Starter #1
From craigslist:

Never opened! Chicago Electric Power Tools (brand) Powder Coating System includes application gun power unit, 6 ft. 120V, 15 amp cord, 8 ft. lead with ground clamp, remote activation switch, 10 ft. lead, 8 ft. high voltage gun power lead, disposable moisture separator.

Still in box.

Call 610-322-8856 for immediate pick up.

He wants $50 for it.

Has anyone ever done their own powdercoating? Is it easy?
 

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You are gonna need more then just that powder coater. You'll need a dedicated oven (preferred) or lamp to bake the powder coat, a booth to spray the parts and something like a media blaster to remove paint and debris already on the parts. I am probably going to get flamed for this, but Harbor Freight makes crap too, so that powder coater will probably break after a few uses.
I have been looking into powdercoating, and for the equipment to do items like rims and frames it is looking like around $3,000 for start up. However, if you bought this and a cheap electric oven, you could probably do some small parts for a reasonable start up cost.
 

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You should also prebake any cast aluminum parts first before spraying them as a precaution. Small pockets of air are sometimes trapped in cast metals and will bubble your finish when you bake the powder coat finish. Also make sure you thoroughly degrease and sand the part before spraying.
 

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I bought the same one from harbor freight for $40 brand new. If you subscribe to their newsletter you get percent off coupons here and there.

I bought 2 1 pound bottles of powder, gloss red, and black. I also splurged on a toaster oven from thrift store for 5 dollars. I have powder coated a few things just for the hell of it, like my rear sprocket and hub. Looks great.

Its fun, just messy if you don't have proper ventilation. I plan to do my triple clamps and rear sets. It has ALREADY paid for itself with me just messing around with it and PCing various things.

Oh, and don't worry about getting "High Temp" masking tape. Regular blue painters tape works fine. ;)

Its easy to do. You prep your gun and compressor.

-You clean and degrease the part you want done.
-Bake it for 15-20 in the oven at 350-400 degree to release captured gases and burn off other crap from the surface.
-Let part stand for 20 minutes or so to cool off completely
-Hang part on a hook and apply current clip to either the piece you're working on, of if you're like me, you use metal hangers and clip it to that.
-Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
-Set your compressor to about 20 PSI on the regulator, then set your gun to a mid level on the palm valve.
-Add your powder to a clean and moisture free PC bottle... there are 2 extras in the kit.
-Test fire and make sure that the PC is coming out evenly and at a uniform volume. Shaking the hopper helps.
-Step on the current switch and start coating the part until all surfaces are covered. Be careful not to get too close or the node will arc to the part.
-Carefully put gun on a hanger of the ground and walk the part to the oven, keeping it on the hanger and trying not to disturb the powder on the surface.
-Place (hang) it in the oven, set your timer for 15-20, and let it bake.

When baking, it melts the powder and it runs all over the surface coating it all. It cures and hardens as well.

PC is tough as hell to get off unless you use gasket remover or Aircraft remover so be sure what you PC is what you want to PC for good.

Wear a mask. PC gets everywhere so have good ventilation. Have fun. :)

Oh, you can buy whatever color you want as a powder coat. Its fairly cheap. Best places to look are online.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the replies.

I have free access to a sandblaster anytime so that won't be a problem at all.

And for the oven, I am moving out of my apartment in May so I don't mind using the house oven, unless that is a horrible idea, and if so, we have two toaster ovens that are never ever used so they could also work. If I used the house oven, I would just get a cheap cookie tray and put it underneath the part in case anything drips.

I guess I'll go with the purchase. I figure I'll do it for small bike parts, and then at the very least, have it around the house to powdercoat whatever else I want done.

Its either buy this for $50 and buy some powder, or spend $30+ on sandpaper, scotch brite pads, spraypaint and possibly primer and have to repaint the parts in the future anyway.
 

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You can never use the oven for food again, once it has been used for powder.

I hate spray paint. Compared to PC, you just LOOK at the paint and it comes off...
 

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Nacademus, how much powder do you go through and how fast?

Should 1lb be enough to do engine case covers, rearsets, passenger sets, and maybe a few other parts? Or should I got with two pounds?

thanks
 

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I have the craftsman powdercoater and have never used it mainly because i dont have access to a spare oven. Has anyone used one of those? also has anyone tried to bake small parts in a toaster oven? heard it may work im not sure though
 

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1 pound is PLENTY. you can do a whole frame easily with a half pound. You may want to get 2 in case you screw up spraying it and lose some... or smudge it. In the event of a smudge, you need to air blast it all off and start over.
 
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