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Discussion Starter #1
Hello I am 16 and i have my drivers license and I need help on what to get for my first bike. I have experience driving manual. I had a trx450 atv which was manual and I have driven my friends 200cc enduro and 85cc 2 stroke and a LOT of mini bikes. So driving manual won’t be a problem. I’ve sat on several cbr600s and loved the way they felt and I was comfortable. I also think they are absolutely beautiful. My dad and I went to a dealer today and talked to the guy there for 2 hours and he thinks the 600 is a bad idea and so does my dad. But 2 of my friends dads think that a 600 would be a smarter choice. They ride also. My dad and the guy at the dealer think I should go with a 300 but I plan on staying in my neighborhood with the 600 for a week or 2 and learning the bike and taking my time. I will be practicing stopping with the brakes and turns and all that. I am also signed up for an msf safety course too. The guy at the dealer said that most guys on the 300s have them for a year and then sell them and move to a 600. I don’t wanna do that and get bored with the bike and have to deal with hassle of selling it. I also read that the 600s are pretty tame below 8k rpms. He also recommended an sv650 or a yzf600 and bikes similar to those but I think those bikes are kinda ugly and I sat on the sv650 and yzf600 and didn’t like it at all. I understand these machines have a ton of power and that’s why I’m gonna take it easy and take as much time as I need to learn the bike. Insurance won’t be an issue either. I want a bike that’s will keep me entertained for a few years. I’ll be paying for the bike with my own money if that matters. I’ve watched vidoes on the 300s and they are complete dogs after hitting 70 or 80 it looks like. 0-100 in 30 seconds I think I saw in one video lol. That also doesn’t seem very safe on the freeway if I need to pass someone or get away from them. So what do you guys recommended? Any advice will be appreciated. Thanks!
 

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No easy answer, it depends on your maturity level.

For some 16 year olds a 600rr can be a reasonable starting point, for others it's a death sentence. I've known more of the former and only one of the latter (went over on his back doing a wheelie at high speed).

Not sure where you got the "600s are pretty tame below 8k rpms" nonsense. Maybe compared to a liter bike. As a purely street rider I'm rarely above 8k and nobody passes me.

You're right about the SV650 though. Bomb-proof motor that will last a lifetime but I couldn't bear sitting on it. I dubbed mine the Iron Triangle and sold it after a couple months.

If you're a 16 year old who intends to keep his license you won't be going above 80 all that often unless you have relatives on the police force. Or a nice rack :)
 

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Wear all the gear, all the time, and ride within your ability. If you do that, you'll probably be fine. For your first bike, I'd recommend that you be able to easily get both feet down, so if you can flat foot (or nearly) a 600RR, go for it. If you can't, start out with a 300 to get the feel of riding on the road. Handling the unexpected is what you need to learn. Being able to plant both feet goes a long way to correcting slow speed mishaps when you're new to motorcycles.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I will be riding with full gear all the time no doubt about that and I can stand on the balls of my feet on both feet on the 600.
 

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Take the MSF course before you buy the bike and see how you feel riding. Make sure you're comfortable on a bike itself. 600s aren't bad starter bikes but it also depends on bike's power usability. A Ninja 650 is going to be tamer and easier to control than a Ninja ZX-6R, for example.

Also,
Insurance won’t be an issue either.
I'm 20 with only 1 speeding ticket to my name;

Insurance for my 300r was around $30/month with $100 deductibles.
Insurance for my 600rr is around $150/month with $500 deductibles.

Being 16 and new to riding expect insurance to be sky-high. You might be better buying a 600cc class bike that's not a super sport.

just my 2c
 

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You’re on here looking for people to tell you to get it so you can show your dad this thread and get the bike you want, I get it, good for you trying and you’ve had several people say it’ll be fine.

So here’s another take:

We have ZERO idea if you can “handle” the bike or if you’ll be “fine” starting on a 600RR. There are people out there who can hand have started on liter bikes without issue, others have started on 250s, crashed and were severely injured. So whether you can or or not is up to you and those who know you.

I can say this about me: I grew up in bikes, started riding before my 4th birthday, was using a manual clutch by 8 and racing with my dad around a parking lot racetracks on RD350s by 13 and if I started with a 600RR as my first streetbike I doubt I’d be here or still riding like most of my school friends who did start on Ninjas, GSXRs and Hurricanes while I started on a ‘75 CL360. I HATED that at the time, but have since learned that was the best thing that ever could have happened, my dad knew best, and I’m glad he gave me that bike nd restricted me.

A 240/300/320/390/400 is a great way to start and you’ll develop skills that will last you your entire riding life if you do it right. Sure you’ll buy a bike, ride and want to move up in a year or so but that’s the fun in riding, trying new things, riding new bikes. Buy a used CBR250 or 300, ride it a year, develop your skills, tip it over a few times, learn what will and won’t kill you and sell it for what you paid for it next year, they hold their value VERY well.

Then get your RR and you’ll have all the beginning bumps and tips out of your system with a bike that’s cheap, easy to ride and you’re not attached to.

YMMV, that’s my opinion. Do what you want, but there’s reason there are small cc bikes out there and now is probably the best time we’ve ever had for solid choices. The RR is a pretty easy bike to ride but it is a bike that can get you in trouble very quickly if you’re not 100% on your game at all times.
 

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I don't think that the riding aspect will get you in trouble


The fact that you're a 16 year old very likely full of piss, vinegar, ego and bad decision making skills is why you shouldn't be on a rocket ship at your age.


But for the reasons above it's pretty well a certainty you won't take anyone's advice and will buy one anyway and in turn, your ticket for the skin graft lottery

Good luck. Don't be an idiot.
 

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i think its best to start on something smaller, it will be easier to ride and more fun to really ring it out and enjoy it.

remember its more fun to drive a slow bike fast than a fast bike slow.

I started on a Kawasaki krr150 Kips 2 stroke(zx1), now on a 600RR and i am glad i started small
 

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There's a specific thread just for you :)

https://www.600rr.net/vb/15-general-discussion/273108-so-you-want-supersport-your-1st-bike.html


In my humble experience I don't think a 16 year old with no riding experience should get on a supersport bike.
A 600 upright street bike would possibly be ok, but the RR is basically a road legal race bike and not very forgiving for learners.

Buy a cheap ugly used bike as a first bike if you're learning. 250-600cc. It's for learning and getting used to riding. You'll still look cool on any kind of motorbike. Motorbikes are ******* cool.
Ride it for the summer, learn to service it, then sell it. Hell you might even fall in love with it. Values don't drop much, as people buy that kind of bike to learn on, so you'll not lose out on $$$.
You'll drop it, it'll get scratched, then you'll be devastated if it's a new shiny bike.

Once you've got 6 months or so under your belt, you can decide if you still like riding, then you can progress to a performance bike :)

Just my 2cents
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thank you everyone! My dad is gonna be test ridint an r3 and a cbr600 at our local dealer. I’ll probably end up getting the r3
 

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R3 really good idea.

Learn moto skills, tune the R3 and cane away.

Please, start riding mountain bikes on trails in your area....and ride them through traffic....this will greatly accelerate your learning curve about SS Motorcycles (fitness plays a big part in riding these bikes properly) and you will learn that OTHER USERS of the road are your main danger!

Take the MSF safe rider course and other safe rider training courses as available in your area

IF your license (and you!) survive 25,000 miles and still enjoying it, upgrade......it's a learning process, and it takes years/miles/resilience/luck to get to a skilled rider level.

You've got a long life ahead.....so take it slowly, and really learn 2 wheels skills before going to a cbr....?

Ride safe and ATGATT! (full gear, best quality gloves....no denim!)

Good luck, and accept your fathers advice!
 

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Thank you everyone! My dad is gonna be test ridint an r3 and a cbr600 at our local dealer. I’ll probably end up getting the r3
:thumbup: Good plan.
You've plenty of time to move up to more powerful bikes, and you'll still have a blast on the R3 for plenty of miles and smiles. Plus it's a great looking bike too :grin2:

:shakehand
 

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I was in your position about 7 years ago. This is my advice:

You're 16, you got plenty of time to learn how to ride. Personally, I think it's smarter starting on a smaller bike. Those bikes are more forgiving to rider error and they are easier to ride which will help you develop your abilities quicker.

I started on a 600, almost crashed on the streets multiple times due to idiocracy and trying to impress people. Don't do that. However, you're 16 so you're probably gonna do that anyway. You're not gonna keep that bike under 8k (who are we kidding) but just be smart. It's easier to just get a bike you're gonna stick with. I wouldn't get a completely perfect bike if I were you, it's nice to get a used one for cheaper because *God Forbid* you drop your bike. It's extremely likely that it's going to happen within your first year.

The biggest thing is that you ride smart. Don't be speeding around cars when you shouldn't be, riding over the speed limit or taking corners at a higher speed than your riding skills can compensate for.

Gear is good. Make sure it fits. Keep us posted.
 
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