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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys so I just signed up for the 2 day course at California Superbike School. I'm a novice rider and have never been to the track before. I just ride the twisties on weekends, and that's about all the experience that I have. I've been riding street bikes for a year now. Anyways, I'm pretty excited to try to get this opportunity to learn how to RIDE my bike. The camp is scheduled to be on the 11 - 12 of November next month and also located at Las Vegas Motor Speedway. Nothing is officially confirmed yet as far as trying to get a week off work to be in Vegas, but hey at least I registered!

Has anyone taken any CSS courses? I've heard nothing but positive outcomes from them. I'm actually really excited about this guys.
 

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2 day camps are with rentals only? $2450?!?!? SHEESH thats expensive.
Think about it like this:

I could take that $2,500 and go to Vegas for the weekend and end up with a headache, a limp **** and a weekend I really can't remember. But everyone tells me I had fun.

Or I can go to something that's a once-in-a-lifetime event, be taught by world class racers, ride a bike on a racetrack for two days most will probably never be able to afford and be able learn my hobby to the point I'll be a better, faster, safer and have more fun rider that's less stressed and better able to deal with day to day situations that learned skills I'll use the rest of my life.

Sounds like a no brainier to me :)
 
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Think about it like this:

I could take that $2,500 and go to Vegas for the weekend and end up with a headache, a limp **** and a weekend I really can't remember. But everyone tells me I had fun.

Or I can go to something that's a once-in-a-lifetime event, be taught by world class racers, ride a bike on a racetrack for two days most will probably never be able to afford and be able learn my hobby to the point I'll be a better, faster, safer and have more fun rider that's less stressed and better able to deal with day to day situations that learned skills I'll use the rest of my life.

Sounds like a no brainier to me :)
oh no I totally agree. Although I would rather learn on my own bike rather than a rented bike even if its a S1000RR. Would be nice to get a feel of my own ya know?
 

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oh no I totally agree. Although I would rather learn on my own bike rather than a rented bike even if its a S1000RR. Would be nice to get a feel of my own ya know?
Agreed but it passes over to any bike. If you wreck at least its not your bike lol
 
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I for one would love to ride one of those BMWs! Everyone raves about how they deliver power and I would to get to test it out in the right conditions aka the track + learn how to be faster on the track. I might aim for next year as a gift to myself...I deserve it haha.
 

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$2,500 is a lot of money but that's not my main concern. My question is how much can a mind absorb in only 2 days?

When I signed up for my very first HPDE several years back (with a car) which was two days as well - that first weekend was the first of MANY track events, and it was more of a shock and overwhelming to my mind more than anything else. It only made a difference and lasting impact when I became consistent and attended on a regular basis to continue to develop my knowledge and skills.

With this said, if I had the means, I'd shell out the moolah to attend this type of event as well.

Please update us on how it all went about afterwards?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
$2,500 is a lot of money but that's not my main concern. My question is how much can a mind absorb in only 2 days?

When I signed up for my very first HPDE several years back (with a car) which was two days as well - that first weekend was the first of MANY track events, and it was more of a shock and overwhelming to my mind more than anything else. It only made a difference and lasting impact when I became consistent and attended on a regular basis to continue to develop my knowledge and skills.

With this said, if I had the means, I'd shell out the moolah to attend this type of event as well.

Please update us on how it all went about afterwards?
Yup I will definitely update you guys! I'll write a detailed description on the whole thing for the guys that want/plan to take this course in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Quick Update:

I had to change the camp dates from November 11 - 12 to November 14 - 15 instead. I couldn't take those days off from work so I'll be going on the weekend instead. I just received my confirmation email and liability forms. I have yet to fill them out and mail them back to the school.
 

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I've done CSS level 1 and 2 here in Sydney. They all preach from the same knowledge base (Twist of the Wrist by Keith Code) so I assume they'd be quite similar in the structure of the school.
Level 1 starts off with the first rule from the book which is throttle control then goes on to turn points, quick steer (getting the bike to the desired lean angle as fast as possible), rider input (loose on the bars) and two step vision (which is sighting the turn point, then sighting the apex before you hit the turn point). Each drill is done per 15/20min track session.
Level 2 then goes to reference points (assigning meaning to certain points of the track as a que for you to start braking, or start turning in etc), line changing, three step vision (like two step but sighting the exit before you hit the apex), wide vision (keeping your survival instincts at bay) and pick up (picking the bike up to decrease lean angle while rolling on the throttle).
It is quite a lot to take in in one/two days so it helps to get yourself a head start already and start reading Twist of the Wrist II.
I'm kind of the type of person who takes knowledge quickly but also can easily forget. So to get maximum benefit from it you really need to practice and keep everything you learn in mind for all the next rides/track days that you subsequently do! I am very much guilty of throwing everything I learn out the window sometimes when I ride cause I enter my own zone of personal thought - and all the bad habits of chopping the throttle and not looking where I need to be looking occurs - I need constant reminders to apply the proper techniques!
The knowledge and confidence attained from a CSS course is priceless. It helped my riding ten fold. Couldn't recommend it more!!!
 

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Sweet! Keep us posted....
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Hey guys! I'm back. I finished level 1 today. I'll just say this to get it out of the wat right now. It's totally worth the money so far. I've learned quite a bit today and had an amazing time on the track. I'm already excited for level 2 tomorrow.

I said earlier that I'll be giving a detailed description on what you do here in this course. I'll just do quick overviews on what we learned about throughout the course and not get into specifics since I'd rather not cause any debating.

Registration starts at 7:00 am. I recommend getting there at least 15 minutes early so that you have some time to eat the free breakfast that they provide you. You immediately are issued your gear after you register. You can also bring your own gear if you desire just as long as it's within guidelines. The breakfast provided to you is actually pretty legit. They cook up some eggs and sausages. There is also fruit and a bunch of other stuff.

Everyone of all levels will receive a quick track orientation going over track rules and flags. After the orientation you are then divided into separate groups. Level 1 splits into 2 groups. Level 3 not sure how they do their thing. There are riders of all levels here. Probably 90% of the people in level 1 have never seen track time let alone ride on a sport bike. You may feel intimidated at first but that will likely go away after the first track session.

So basically throughout the whole day you will have a classroom followed by track time. Class is approximately 30 min long. I actually wasn't paying attention to the clock because I was really paying attention to what the subject was about. Then you will go out on the track and focus what you learned about in class. At some point you will go out and ride the steering bike. My group did it early before we even had our first track session. You will also at some point ride the camera bike.

The steering bike is basically for one of your coaches (yes you have more than 1 coach) to look at how you steer a motorcycle. He/she then will give you inputs ate correcting any issues he sees with you. The camera bike is basically used to capture your riding video. The camera will capture all of your lines. You will then be able to watch how you did. A coach will be there giving pointers out from the video.

The classroom sessions are very informative. They are taught by Dylan and Jon. They have a good sense of humor so it never felt boring at any time. They will get very in depth with cornering theory. They also make it understandable by giving good examples. Make sure to pay attention to what you're learning about because you will be asked right before you get on the track.

The track sessions were what made my day just awesome. It was my first time getting on the track. It was just an incredible experience like as if I just found God. I can't exactly remember how many track sessions we had but there was definitely plenty enough. I'd say we got out there 7 times. There were 5 drills to work on. Then you have 2 sessions where you can work on what you feel you are struggling with. You will get a debrief after each session. It is important to discuss all of your inputs to your track coach. He will give you feedback on what you can do. He will also follow you around the track. You won't know he's there until he spots a few mistakes and zooms right past you for you to follow his lead. My track coach was extremely helpful. I got better after every track session by following his inputs. My last session of the day was by far the best. All of the 5 drills we worked on came all together.

Our track bikes were '15 BMW S1000RR. That bike is something else. I thought my CBR600RR was fast. Then I hopped onto this thing. My bar has been raised quite a bit. The first few sessions you are only to be allowed to ride in 3rd and 4th gear with minimal brakes. Later on you can use all gears with as much braking as desired. It was a good way to break my liter bike virginity by riding the S1000RR on a track!

I wrote a pretty long write-up by not getting too specific. But all i have to say so far is that I am so glad I took this course. Just on day 1 I feel my riding has increased tenfold. Sorry if you spot a lot of grammar errors. I did this write-up on a tablet.
 
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