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my first bike was a Honda Shadow Spirit 750; i rode it for over a year, sold for nearly what I paid for it, and bought a brand new 2013 CBR 600 RR two weeks ago. i'm very glad i had the cruiser first, it was very forgiving on input mistakes. CBR not so much. i'm getting a good hang of it now, my shifts are much smoother, my throttle is not choppy, especially in 1st and 2nd gear, and during slow cruising. i'm glad i had the cruiser experience before coming to a super sport :) i think if the 600RR was my first bike there would be a good chance i would have put it down because my throttle and brake inputs were not obviously refined when i first started to ride.
 

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My first bike was a Suzuki Katana. Brand new '97. Then bought a new 2000 CBR 600 F4. After seven years, a new 2007 CBR600RR. Still love it. Just about to turn 16K. All 600's. My next bike? Not until there is a whole new designed CBR 600. The bike is basically the same from '07-'15. We will see what 2016 has in store.
 

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This won't be my first bike but my first sport bike. I'm looking forward to picking it up Wednesday! It's a 2008 600rr graffiti edition. Looking forward to it!
 

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My first bike was an 06 CBR 600 RR which I basically wrecked into a mountain and fractured my scaphoid with. It's now forever damaged since I failed to get it operated on when I should have. Live and learn I guess. Granted if I ever fracture my right hands scaphoids I'm basically saying fck everything and MAKING SURE it heals properly.

Next bike was an 09 race prepped R6 that's a TAD too fast for what I'm comfortable with. At least I thought I was uncomfortable with it until 11 days when I had a blast! Haha.
 

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This is my first bike:

It's been 3 months, and I can say that my comfort level with it has risen tremendously. I still have a lot to learn before I can shift quicky/smoothly, but I have all the basics down and I love the power I have for taking off from a stop or getting to the speed limit from a highway ramp.

Having said that, I've been careful as f*** starting out. I've been riding quiet streets, cornering at low speeds with minimal lean, and shifting slowly enough to let the RPMs drop all the way while clutched. My shifting is mostly gentle now, but I gotta work on doing it faster.

I think there are a few points that 1st timers need to understand to not regret starting on a supersport. I'm making them up on the fly. I haven't violated any of these myself, which is why I'm writing about my positive experience:
  1. Wear a FULL set of gear: full-face helmet, over-the-ankle boots, armored pants, armored jacket, solid gloves.
  2. The throttle is very sensitive, ESPECIALLY in 1st gear.
  3. The power at high RPMs is NOTHING like what it is at low RPMs... don't underestimate it. Get there gradually. If starting from a stop and you want to fly, roll on the throttle gently, do NOT flick it to max or you will loop a wheelie.
  4. Avoid stunts (that includes wheelies) entirely. If you think you're wiser than that, please post pics/videos of your attempt in the appropriate section.
  5. Don't ever drop the clutch. Be overly gentle and smooth with it.
  6. Avoid riding in the rain/snow.
  7. Keep your speed well within your comfort zone. You WILL be surprised while turning and there will be times you will run wider than you want to. Expect this and ride slower so you have more opportunity to recover.
  8. Avoid any drastic changes to the speed of either of your wheels while leaning in a turn. Avoid shifting during turns for now just in case you re-engage the clutch harshly causing loss of traction. Avoid sharp application of brakes during turns.
If you do start out on a supersport, you'll probably be using 5% of its potential for quite a while. I haven't pushed mine to its limit because it's too much. It will take time to make gradual progress. Decide if that's something you'd be okay with and have the self-control to ride within your limits, not the bike's limits.
 

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If you do start out on a supersport, you'll probably be using 5% of its potential for quite a while. I haven't pushed mine to its limit because it's too much. It will take time to make gradual progress. Decide if that's something you'd be okay with and have the self-control to ride within your limits, not the bike's limits.
If you want to do this, that is what a track is for.
 

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Tracks require you to have some time under your belt before visiting and understandably so. Off the top of my head the local ones here require at least 1 year riding or 5k miles.

I cannot and do not speak for anyone else but for me starting on the 600rr ended up being the right choice.
 

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Tracks require you to have some time under your belt before visiting and understandably so. Off the top of my head the local ones here require at least 1 year riding or 5k miles.

I cannot and do not speak for anyone else but for me starting on the 600rr ended up being the right choice.
To me it seems you're so busy trying not to screw up that you are not enjoying the bike as much as you 'should' be. I didn't say you weren't enjoying it but I think if you would have started smaller and got those initial miles on something easier to build confidence skills and throttle control your experience on the 600 would be a lot better. I know when I went to my 600 I enjoyed from the first day and I attribute a lot of that to having started on a 250.
 

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I have been going back and forth about trading my DRZ400SM for a Supersport. I keep reading all these articles about "supersport as first bike". I've ridden my DRZ400SM for 8 months - would a supersport still count as a first bike or is 8 months (about 3k miles) enough for a supersport to be counted as a second bike? Am I bringing enough experience from my DRZ in order to not kill myself on a SS?
 

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I have been going back and forth about trading my DRZ400SM for a Supersport. I keep reading all these articles about "supersport as first bike". I've ridden my DRZ400SM for 8 months - would a supersport still count as a first bike or is 8 months (about 3k miles) enough for a supersport to be counted as a second bike? Am I bringing enough experience from my DRZ in order to not kill myself on a SS?
Only you can judge that...

Some people with 8 months experience don't know s+it... And some people with 2 months experience do...

You show know how well furnished is the inside of your head.

For me, I started with a 600RR 2003, limited to 34 HP... Two years from that day I de-limited the bike... No regrets at all!
 

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Am I bringing enough experience from my DRZ in order to not kill myself on a SS?
It all depends on you. You can easily have a fatal crash on a 150. A supersport will let you achieve higher speeds in a shorter time when you are asking for it and have a more responsive (and sensitive) throttle that could throw you off the bike or do an unwanted uncontrolled wheelie if you twist the throttle too much. I think only you can answer your question based on your riding style and how in-control you are. If you can't trust yourself to not make significant power or traction mistakes, I'd hold off for now. What's making you want a SS though? Do you feel that you are reaching the limits of the DRZ?
 

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To me it seems you're so busy trying not to screw up that you are not enjoying the bike as much as you 'should' be. I didn't say you weren't enjoying it but I think if you would have started smaller and got those initial miles on something easier to build confidence skills and throttle control your experience on the 600 would be a lot better. I know when I went to my 600 I enjoyed from the first day and I attribute a lot of that to having started on a 250.

This, but my experience is a bit different. I started on a 600cc motorcycle (my RR) and sure I learned it. But I had a similar experience (starting small and moving up) with driving CARS on the track. I started with a Mr2 Spyder on the street, did a trackday, spun out like 5-7 times. Did another trackday in a car that has more power and amazing handling (e46 M3) and spun out more times then I did in the Mr2. Went back out with the Mr2, learned the car really well, now I rarely spin out. Took the M3 back out there, and it was the easiest thing to drive, or at least a lot more controllable since I learned to drive the hell out of the Mr2. I'm sure the experience is the same with the motorcycle and the curve is probably a bigger learning curve. I was kind of able to get into the car, set a decent lap time, spin out 5-7 times learning the car, and by 2 track days later I was driving in one of the fastest groups and not spinning out at all. The 2nd track day was in the rain though, and that REALLLLLLY helped me learn how to control a car. (the Mr2 can't break a 1:30 so I can't drive in Red group with it) just to give you a comparison, it took me something like.... 3 or 4 track days on the CBR to move into B group, and then a couple more (maybe another 5-6 track days in B group) to move into A group. So, I think starting a smaller, more easier to control ANYTHING, is always better.
 

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I have been going back and forth about trading my DRZ400SM for a Supersport. I keep reading all these articles about "supersport as first bike". I've ridden my DRZ400SM for 8 months - would a supersport still count as a first bike or is 8 months (about 3k miles) enough for a supersport to be counted as a second bike? Am I bringing enough experience from my DRZ in order to not kill myself on a SS?

You say you've put 3k miles in the 8 months you've had that bike onto it, but what were the conditions like over the course of those 3k miles? Have you had an off at all? Do you remember why you had an off if you did? What did you do, how did the bike react? If you've had an off and can understand those things, you are MORE prepared IMO to ride an SS. Just the basic knowledge of knowing how to operate a vehicle some power and having continuously operated it gives you an advantage. If however your operation of the vehicle has been ONLY, get on bike, ride easy, get off bike, then I would say that isn't suffice.
 

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My first bike was an 09' Cbr600RR. I think it was fine, the low end is mellow enough (I originally wanted a ducati... the power curve is WAY too aggressive). I agree with most on here, SELF CONTROL is seriously needed. Shift early and make it a gradual progress. The minute you get cocky, you will be in trouble. Also, watch twist the wrist on youtube repeatedly.
 

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Here in Australia you can't ride a supersport as your first bike. We have a LAMS scheme which IMO is a lot better than allowing novices to jump straight to a supersport.
 

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Knowing how I am specifically, the 600RR would have most definitely been too much for me to handle and manage as a first bike. I had zero experience on a motorcycle except for the two days in the MSF course I completed, plus I'm a very gradual learner.

My prior 300R taught me a great deal, and I also had lots of fun riding it. The only reason I gave it up was because I was reversed into by another car, and felt it was time for a change after that incident. Racked up just under 5k miles on it, and had it for just under a year as well. My goal was to compliment it with a 600RR after another year or two.

On my '14 600RR, I have about 2k miles after purchasing new 2 - 3 months ago, and I've gotten more comfortable with it... Although it's going to be a while before the bike becomes second nature to me. Riding it every chance I can though. I expect 7 - 8k miles on the odometer per year, and I won't be shy on using it more if I can.

I do ride a Rebel on the side to keep myself in check and also to get away from the supersport when I've had enough of it for the time. Riding motorcycles can take a lot of energy, and the sport bike takes a lot more, in my opinion. And I exercise regularly to keep in fairly good shape, and I'm only 30 years old currently.
 
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Knowing how I am specifically, the 600RR would have most definitely been too much for me to handle and manage as a first bike. I had zero experience on a motorcycle except for the two days in the MSF course I completed, plus I'm a very gradual learner.

My prior 300R taught me a great deal, and I also had lots of fun riding it. The only reason I gave it up was because I was reversed into by another car, and felt it was time for a change after that incident. Racked up just under 5k miles on it, and had it for just under a year as well. My goal was to compliment it with a 600RR after another year or two.

On my '14 600RR, I have about 2k miles after purchasing new 2 - 3 months ago, and I've gotten more comfortable with it... Although it's going to be a while before the bike becomes second nature to me. Riding it every chance I can though. I expect 7 - 8k miles on the odometer per year, and I won't be shy on using it more if I can.

I do ride a Rebel on the side to keep myself in check and also to get away from the supersport when I've had enough of it for the time. Riding motorcycles can take a lot of energy, and the sport bike takes a lot more, in my opinion. And I exercise regularly to keep in fairly good shape, and I'm only 30 years old currently.
Oh hell being in good shape is ideal when riding a sportbike because WHEN(not if) you go down, your body has a better chance of suffering less injury. Plus your recovery time should be shortened significantly if you're in good physical shape (my inner gym rat speakin here)
 

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Oh hell being in good shape is ideal when riding a sportbike because WHEN(not if) you go down, your body has a better chance of suffering less injury. Plus your recovery time should be shortened significantly if you're in good physical shape (my inner gym rat speakin here)
I don't lift weights - just run miles... But I'm thinking that's not the same as what you're referring to, possibly.
 
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It's cool, I'm fat. My body crashes well. ? track crashes have proved such.
 
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