Honda CBR 600RR Forum banner

441 - 460 of 468 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
My first bike was an 80's cb 250 which was down and out more then it was ridden. But for $23 at auction what do you expect?

Next thing I rode was 125 dirt bikes. Then fro there I went and rode some friends 600s including the f4i and an rr, I loved them.

But then I got heavy and got a wild hair up my behind for a liter bike and now own a zx10r.

The larger bikes are different almost all together in all honesty. Throttle is even more sensitive power is on tap. And turning is.. Awkward at low speed but I'm getting used to it. Been using the company parking lot to get the hang of the bike before getting on the street.
So I've only owned two bikes personally...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Trying to figure out my radiator problems guys. I have a 2003 Honda cbr600rr, and if I'm not mistaken...the only thing holding my radiator in place is its hoses.

And in the pictures below you can see that I have the side fairings taken off on the right side of the bike. Am I missing the point of attachments for the radiator?

I took pictures of both side views of the radiator area. Let me know what you guys think! I'm in the process of getting new fairings because mine are trashed, I wanna get the mechanical stuff done before the new ones come in. You can even see in one picture that I have some fluid on my fingers from the bottom corner of my radiator. I may have a leak? Probably needs a new radiator because this bike has been laid down from previous owner, and I don't know of every thing that was damaged or possibly rigged. But for the most part, my bike is running great with no issues!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,538 Posts
Trying to figure out my radiator problems guys. I have a 2003 Honda cbr600rr, and if I'm not mistaken...the only thing holding my radiator in place is its hoses.

And in the pictures below you can see that I have the side fairings taken off on the right side of the bike. Am I missing the point of attachments for the radiator?

I took pictures of both side views of the radiator area. Let me know what you guys think! I'm in the process of getting new fairings because mine are trashed, I wanna get the mechanical stuff done before the new ones come in. You can even see in one picture that I have some fluid on my fingers from the bottom corner of my radiator. I may have a leak? Probably needs a new radiator because this bike has been laid down from previous owner, and I don't know of every thing that was damaged or possibly rigged. But for the most part, my bike is running great with no issues!

Pictures are tiny for me, but there is a lower radiator bracket that shouldn't be too difficult to locate and screw off. I think it's an 8mm socket, maybe 10 or 12, you might need a 3 or 6 inch extension on a 1/4 inch drive with a swiveling socket attachment, but I can't recall exactly. There's also a mounting bracket up on the top of the radiator and it mounts to the frame. (I believe) I believe it's held in with 1 screw and then it slides either left or right to get off of the nipple it has there for it to sit on. You can pick up a radiator from eBay for $60-80 or something, or try to find an OEM one on the forums. I replaced my 06's with an eBay one and it worked fine. Everything was ALMOST the same, I just had a little difficulty installing it because the bracket needed a little manipulating. But it worked well and the bike ran fine after that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Started with '11 250r then my wife took it from me. :( Currently riding an '04 600rr with 75,xxx and still going strong. Learning to build your skills on a smaller bike gives you an advantage to ride the bigger cc's bottom line. I must admit, you can't whip a 600rr around the track as nimbly as a 250r.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
537 Posts
This topic is still going I see.
It's amusing as pretty much nowhere else in the world allows inexperienced riders to use Supersports as a first bike.

Those that think they went fine starting off with a Supersports would have probably failed the motorcycle test in Japan for over 400cc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
Here's the deal, I'm going to speak the truth and many will not like it.

There are some people that can start on a 600cc sportbike, and develop their skills not just in handling the bike, but negotiating traffic, road conditions, weather, etc. It all depends on the individuals mindset/approach, athletic abilities, common sense, good judgement, and quite frankly instinct. That said, we are all human, and people do make mistakes, and starting on a 600 will increase that possibility if you fail in any one of the "criteria" I mentioned previously.

The advantages of starting out on a smaller displacement motorcycle is that you can fail in one or more criteria, and still remain relatively in control of the situation. If you do get into an accident, you have a better chance to escape major injury or damage to your bike, but the possibility of something serious is still very real. Furthermore, because the speeds are lower, it lessons the desire to go fast which results in the individual paying more attention to mastering the basics.

The disadvantage of starting out on a smaller displacement motorcycle is you will likely lose some money when you upgrade to a 600, and .... when you do get on the 600, it will be almost like learning how to ride all over again - it truly is a different beast. This is similar when going from a 600 to a 1000.

Now for the haters of my post - I completely understand, and quite frankly even agree, I just lean on the side of depending on who you are, you might be able to do it and do it well.

One last thing - 1000's are definitely off the table ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
Nah man, a Ninja 300 doesn't come with the attitude that you are gonna do wheelies and full throttle pulls on the streetz.

Our goal as motorcyclists is to reduce our risk. Issue is that many young and dumb new riders think they can go out and get that sweet, sweet R6.

Would you let your 16 y/o kid drive a Dodge Viper pre-dynamics control? That thing would be a suicide machine!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
537 Posts
Here's the deal, I'm going to speak the truth and many will not like it.

There are some people that can start on a 600cc sportbike, and develop their skills not just in handling the bike, but negotiating traffic, road conditions, weather, etc. It all depends on the individuals mindset/approach, athletic abilities, common sense, good judgement, and quite frankly instinct. That said, we are all human, and people do make mistakes, and starting on a 600 will increase that possibility if you fail in any one of the "criteria" I mentioned previously.

The advantages of starting out on a smaller displacement motorcycle is that you can fail in one or more criteria, and still remain relatively in control of the situation. If you do get into an accident, you have a better chance to escape major injury or damage to your bike, but the possibility of something serious is still very real. Furthermore, because the speeds are lower, it lessons the desire to go fast which results in the individual paying more attention to mastering the basics.

The disadvantage of starting out on a smaller displacement motorcycle is you will likely lose some money when you upgrade to a 600, and .... when you do get on the 600, it will be almost like learning how to ride all over again - it truly is a different beast. This is similar when going from a 600 to a 1000.

Now for the haters of my post - I completely understand, and quite frankly even agree, I just lean on the side of depending on who you are, you might be able to do it and do it well.

One last thing - 1000's are definitely off the table ;)
Good post. I don't necessarily agree with everything you've said, but it's good to see a well constructed argument.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
Nah man, a Ninja 300 doesn't come with the attitude that you are gonna do wheelies and full throttle pulls on the streetz.

Our goal as motorcyclists is to reduce our risk. Issue is that many young and dumb new riders think they can go out and get that sweet, sweet R6.

Would you let your 16 y/o kid drive a Dodge Viper pre-dynamics control? That thing would be a suicide machine!
Well, your key word here is young. In the USA, I personally believe a reasonable age for access to legally ride a 600cc sportbike should be within the range of 18 to 21 years old, i.e. legally considered an adult. I further believe that to legally ride a 1000cc supersport should be at least 21 years old, with a good driving record (not perfect, but good). Beyond that, for those that I consider "adults", if they meet my personal criteria, I have no problems recommending starting on a 600.

The euro stepped approach is good, but it is a nanny state approach. Let the parents decide, and keep the "state" out of it for the most part.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
334 Posts
Here's the deal, I'm going to speak the truth and many will not like it.


The advantages of starting out on a smaller displacement motorcycle is that you can fail in one or more criteria, and still remain relatively in control of the situation. If you do get into an accident, you have a better chance to escape major injury or damage to your bike, but the possibility of something serious is still very real. Furthermore, because the acceleration is slower, it lessons the desire to go fast which results in the individual paying more attention to mastering the basics.

I edited the only part of your argument that I feel is better properly defined. Speed is speed, but the fact that acceleration is slower makes the difference. But I agree 1000% with what you are saying as I have believed/thought the exact same thing.

I ring my own bell for a minute...

I started riding 3 years ago. No experience on motorcycles EVER and a GSXR 600 was the first bike I bought. Straight from a mountain bike to a 600cc. Now, mind you, I learned to ride in a parking lot on a buddy of mine's GSXR. I then bought my own, and after only 3.5 months of riding on the street, I jumped on the track for the first time. Did OK, but held my own considering my experience.

Second track day after 4.5 months...had my first and ONLY crash to date. I high-sided somewhere between 60-75 going into a corner. I didn't like my line and I thought I was good enough to brake, correct my line, come in lower to hit the apex....nope...got thrown down the track. I did not get hurt at all, and I contribute that fact to notion that I have lifted weights all my life (I'm in my mid 30s) and I am very durable. I am more athletic and in shape to day than I was when I was 18.

Now...I can seriously out ride a lot of guys that have been riding their entire lives. I'm NOT TRYING to tout my ego like I'm the next MotoGP champ, but I can ride. I'm not trying to grandstand at all, but just like you mentioned and I hold high belief, not all of us are created equal. Some are better than others at certain things and have the talent to jump on a 600cc for a first bike and be perfectly fine.

I contribute a lot of the posts where veterans are scolding other new riders to not get a 600cc because of their own fevered egos. They think that they are so masterful and that no one can possibly achieve their Rossiness unless they get a 250 or 300 to start on. It's a forum people...you don't know who most of these newbies are in real life...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,362 Posts
I contribute a lot of the posts where veterans are scolding other new riders to not get a 600cc because of their own fevered egos. They think that they are so masterful and that no one can possibly achieve their Rossiness unless they get a 250 or 300 to start on. It's a forum people...you don't know who most of these newbies are in real life...
That is some funny **** right there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
I edited the only part of your argument that I feel is better properly defined. Speed is speed, but the fact that acceleration is slower makes the difference. But I agree 1000% with what you are saying as I have believed/thought the exact same thing.
I appreciate that, but if we are to be honest, if you are young, and young is to be defined as 18 to 24, and you want to get a 600cc sportbike for your first bike, your "good judgement" is already called into question. I'm not saying it's bad judgement, but it does raise an eyebrow. I believe the general consensus is that the human brain doesn't finalize it's wiring until age 25.

So if I were to generalize my overall thought about this topic, I would frown upon anyone starting on a 600. Although people are amazing, so I leave the door open for the possibility that there are people who can do it, and do it well. The problem for those that decide to proceed is it is likely that they do meet the criteria, except good judgement. So there is yet another criteria that should be introduced, and that is ego.

While an individual starting on a 600 develops their riding skills, and thinks to themselves they got this, this is not that difficult, they better damn well keep their ego in check, because it is their ego that will send them low siding into a guard rail on a sharp turn while their torso gets ripped in half, and their helmet, with skull inside goes cartwheeling over the embankment.

I think the correlation to ego is the phrase "Never go full retard". While you do have to exceed your comfort zone a little bit in order to improve, it is to what degree you push yourself where your ego comes into play. Just be level headed about getting better - time is on your side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,362 Posts
People should ride what they like. Have insurance and be accountable for other people you may hurt. Want to start on a liter bike? Awesome, have fun. Hurt someone along the way? Pay for it or I hope you burn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
537 Posts
I don't think anyone's going to be swaying other people's opinions on this matter on what people should be starting on, and that's fine - it is a forum after all and it's good discussion.

However, I do think statements like this is a pre-cursor for a big accident.

Now...I can seriously out ride a lot of guys that have been riding their entire lives. I'm touting my ego like I'm the next MotoGP champ, but I can ride. I'm not trying to grandstand at all, but just like you mentioned and I hold high belief, not all of us are created equal. Some are better than others at certain things and have the talent to jump on a 600cc for a first bike and be perfectly fine.

You are probably out-riding a lot of guys who have been riding their entire lives because they have probably been in a similar situation/mindset as yours and then did something to re-evaluate how they ride. You are not more talented than anyone else over here. No one is impressed that you jumped on a 600cc as a first bike and rode around the parking lot. "but I can ride" - OK? So can about 500 million other people the world over.

As TheX said above, have fun, but don't be surprised if you find yourself re-evaluating your riding after baring your grandiose ego for everyone to see and then having a moment of enlightenment in a year.

There are people in competitive racing who have been racing 600s for years starting off on 50cc bikes at a young age. But what an honour on our very own forum here to have the next Isle of Man, MotoGP, WSBK, AMA, BSB Championship here with us! Hear hear C. Chaos. We'll be sure to consult your vast riding experience. I recommend you go around and preach to the "veterans" about how you can out ride them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
You are probably out-riding a lot of guys who have been riding their entire lives because they have probably been in a similar situation/mindset as yours and then did something to re-evaluate how they ride. You are not more talented than anyone else over here. No one is impressed that you jumped on a 600cc as a first bike and rode around the parking lot. "but I can ride" - OK? So can about 500 million other people the world over.
Well said RothmansRR. The key to riding fast is being smooth on your inputs, finding the right lines, and knowing when to exceed your limits, and by how much.\

But back on topic, I still say it is possible for people to do it, and do it well. Not everyone starting on a 600 has the ambition to be the next Marquez. The main point here is having fun safely for not only yourself, but also those around you, be it solo or in a group ride. Meet "my" criteria, and you have a green light by me. Who am I? Nobody, just some knucklehead on the internet.
 
441 - 460 of 468 Posts
Top