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Discussion Starter #1
is it hard to do. what tools do i need?
 

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It's not that hard, just kind of time consuming.

8mm socket
12mm socket (I think you need it for something...)
14mm socket
17mm socket
32mm socket (or whatever size the rear axle nut is, I can't remember)
Chain breaker/riveting tool
10mm box end wrench
12mm box end wrench
Torque wrench
Rear stand
Service manual is a big help for torque specs

I think that's about it. If you need to take links off the new chain, having a bench grinder makes it a lot easier to push pins out. Also, when installing the rear sprocket and tightening the studs, make sure to torque them in a star pattern, not just around in a circle.
 

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Add two more things to that list: A dremel tool, and someone who knows how to do it to show you the first time. Like changing tires, it's not particularly difficult, but there are a few techniques involved that are a little hard to explain.
 

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Add two more things to that list: A dremel tool, and someone who knows how to do it to show you the first time. Like changing tires, it's not particularly difficult, but there are a few techniques involved that are a little hard to explain.
Good idea to have someone there that has done it before.... BUT.... not really necessary. Definately something you can do on your own. Good luck, don't forget about this thread when you have a question!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
cool thanks guys. any o-siders here who wanna help a brotha our let me know.
 

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These parts on the back of the hub are not supposed to be touching the rim when installed right? Mine are close but not touching when i installed it on.

 

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You will also want to have a set of digital calipers on hand to measure the rivet peen when you install the master link. It is also a good idea to measure the width of one of the links in the new chain so you will know how far down to press the master link.

Installing a new chain and sprockets is not difficult, but if you have not done it before, take your time and double check your work
 

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+1 for the calipers. I used some and totally forgot to add them to my list. Well done.

checking the outside diameter of the pins that you rivet when installing the master link will ensure that you have sufficiently enlarged the face of the pin to the point where it will not be able to back out.

I did my chain and sprocket install sight unseen and without help, but if you can find someone who has done it before and can help you, go for it.
 

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Most important part? The entire have the bike in neutral. do NOT use the tranny to hold the front sprocket from turning while you crank on it. You want to have the chain wrapped around the sprockets and put something through the rear rim so it keeps the front from turning, use the rear brakes with the chain wrapped around the sprockets or use and air compressor to get it off. But always have the bike in Neutral! Or you can turn a simple chain kit job into a very expensive tranny job.
 

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Most important part? The entire have the bike in neutral. do NOT use the tranny to hold the front sprocket from turning while you crank on it. You want to have the chain wrapped around the sprockets and put something through the rear rim so it keeps the front from turning, use the rear brakes with the chain wrapped around the sprockets or use and air compressor to get it off. But always have the bike in Neutral! Or you can turn a simple chain kit job into a very expensive tranny job.
What I did was step on the rear brake while I loosen/tighten the front sprocket bolt (stand on the right side of the bike, step on the rear brake and reach over the seat and pull the wrench)
 
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