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What do you do about the fairings on your street bike for a trackday?

  • Ride with street fairings

    Votes: 15 53.6%
  • Swap on track fairings, swap back to street fairings after trackday

    Votes: 5 17.9%
  • Swap on track fairings, leave on until no more track days planned

    Votes: 1 3.6%
  • Ride with track fairings all the time

    Votes: 4 14.3%
  • Other - describe

    Votes: 3 10.7%

  • Total voters
    28
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Discussion Starter #1
For people who do track days on their street bikes, what do you do regarding fairings?
 

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Options:

1) Run OEM plastics and tape up mirrors/headlights/markers/brake lights
2) Swap ON/OFF between OEM fairings and Track fairings (very time consuming)
3) Run Track Fairings and cut-out healight spots in track fairings
4) Run Track Fairings and just mount a 55w light and bar-end mirror
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I rode in street trim until I had a lowside, which was expensive because I won't settle for anything less than OEM fitment.

I moved onto swapping fairings on and off after every event, which got old after one season. Now I just leave the track fairings on until I don't have trackdays planned. I feel it's a bit silly because I effectively convert my street bike into a track bike for half the year.
 

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I had the exact same experience as phase12rr - first street, then lowside, then swapping after every event, then leaving on. I then progressed to owning two different bikes - one for street, another for track. Now, I've given up a supersport on the street completely - too dangerous. Track only is the way to go. (I still ride a little Ninja 250 sometimes on the street.)
 

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I used to only have my F4i, did 4-5 trackdays on it. The only thing I did was tape up the glass and lower the tire pressure.
 

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I just showed up and rode. Plan to do the same with my current bike.

If you're just doing track days, you shouldn't really be crashing. I know people are going to freak out at that statement, but a track day isn't for going out and going as fast as you can. Its for going on a track and safely operating your bike and working on your riding ability. Most crashes I've seen from street riders at track days have been very obvious. You can usually point out who will crash after the first session.


If you want to go to the track and ride with wreckless abandon, do yourself a favor and buy an old rat bagged track Nike for a couple grand and yard that one up. Leave your poor minty street bike out of it
 

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I just showed up and rode. Plan to do the same with my current bike.

If you're just doing track days, you shouldn't really be crashing. I know people are going to freak out at that statement, but a track day isn't for going out and going as fast as you can. Its for going on a track and safely operating your bike and working on your riding ability. Most crashes I've seen from street riders at track days have been very obvious. You can usually point out who will crash after the first session.


If you want to go to the track and ride with wreckless abandon, do yourself a favor and buy an old rat bagged track Nike for a couple grand and yard that one up. Leave your poor minty street bike out of it
What? So theoretically if I'm racing my buddies around the track having fun or I'm trying to beat my own previous lap times and I accidentally crash, I shouldn't be doing track days because I'm riding on a street bike and I should only be going at a slower pace? Why should I wear gear then since I shouldn't need to use it right? :crackup: I don't think it really matters what you're riding, if you're on a race track you should always be prepared to crash, just like the street except on a race track, the idea like you said is to work on your riding, which generally means testing new skills and most people have to punch outside their comfort zones a little bit for the first time in order to get better and more efficient with their skills, which is what a lot of people enjoy and care about. The way I see it is, if you're going to be riding like a snail and have everyone else have to pass you every lap because you're worried about your fairings on a closed and regulated circuit, go back to riding on the expressway and save your attendance for someone else. Don't get me wrong, nobody ever needs to push way outside their comfort zones and they should ride at their own pace, but eventually it'll get pretty old when you're still running in the novice groups all the time and some middle aged lady is passing you on her ninja 250. If I crashed my track bodywork I would be even more devastated considering they needed custom paint and one off applications to accommodate aftermarket parts/harnesses and hardware that cost thousands of dollars. I'm not going to not ride it because of that though, **** happens and insurance is a good thing to have.
 

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If you're the throttle happy type... don't, I crashed on my first track day, broke all the fairings, stays, headlights, exhaust cf clamp pegs and lever...if u can stay on top of the fact that its just a trackday, take it easy and pick up pace in steps, I dont see a reason why you shouldn't take her in street trim
 

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Trackdays

Trackdays suit all levels of riding ability from complete novices up to seasoned racers on road or track bikes. They also give you the opportunity to ride some of the world's best circuits; particularly here in the UK. As long as you go with the attitude that its simply a trackday, and not racing, its the safest and purist way to exploit the potential of a Supersports bike.
 

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Used to ride with street fairing only; now running track fairing with cutout for the light.

This way I don't have to keep it obesesively clean like my OEM fairing used to be.

Funnily enough, right after I put the track fairing, I lowsided due to someone spilling oil on the blind apex.

I counted my lucky stars that I've the track fairing on and not the OEM one.

Beside track fairing makes working on the bike so much easier. They're easier to take off and put on.
e.g. I can remove my tank cover and work under the tank without removing any of the other fairing.

With the oem, I have to remove both sides before I can remove the tank.
 

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not much to add after 03cbr-rider's comment, but there's always a chance of a get off whether you are on the street or a closed circuit. i had a low side on the first lap of the day once going very slow just due to cold tires and dew on the track. i hit the corner entry of a set of esses and the bike acted like i was on ice and shot out from under me. that was after i had done over 20 trackdays, so i was far from a novice.

others also bring up a good point when they say it may be a PITA to swap street trim for track skins all summer long. i hope to have a new-to-me bike in the next few weeks, and i fully plan to swap out clean OEM body work for track skins. remember, if you do go down, it's usually more than just body work that gets hurt. i'd say that this will need to be a decision only you can make. have fun out there!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I just showed up and rode. Plan to do the same with my current bike.

If you're just doing track days, you shouldn't really be crashing. I know people are going to freak out at that statement, but a track day isn't for going out and going as fast as you can. Its for going on a track and safely operating your bike and working on your riding ability. Most crashes I've seen from street riders at track days have been very obvious. You can usually point out who will crash after the first session.


If you want to go to the track and ride with wreckless abandon, do yourself a favor and buy an old rat bagged track Nike for a couple grand and yard that one up. Leave your poor minty street bike out of it
I agree to some extent. Ideally, riders would progressively build skill over track time. And with more skill, you decrease the probability of crashing. So with more track time should come more skill. But what does that mean for the novice? I will openly admit, my crash occurred when I was a novice and was completely my fault. However, I doubt you would've been able to pick me out of a group to be the one to low side, but I do agree that you can sometimes pick out those who are destined to crash. And admittedly, with the skills I have picked up since then, I probably would have been able to avoid my crash. But I chalk it up to an expensive lesson learned on body positioning that I could not have learned on the street.

The track provides an environment where riders can experiment and develop their skills. I think we could all agree that if someone is going try something gutsy, they should try it on the track rather than the street. And sometimes, it's another rider who causes you to crash, and that sometimes is totally unpredictable.

Then there are the logistics of owning two bikes if you have one just for trackdays. Some people just don't have the time or space to keep and maintain two bikes. And I'm not one who wants to bring my trackbike to a paid trackday just to learn that my bike has developed a problem and I can't ride that day.

For me, those are some of the reasons why I ended up with track fairings for my street bike.
 

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What? So theoretically if I'm racing my buddies around the track having fun or I'm trying to beat my own previous lap times and I accidentally crash, I shouldn't be doing track days because I'm riding on a street bike and I should only be going at a slower pace? Why should I wear gear then since I shouldn't need to use it right? :crackup: I don't think it really matters what you're riding, if you're on a race track you should always be prepared to crash, just like the street except on a race track, the idea like you said is to work on your riding, which generally means testing new skills and most people have to punch outside their comfort zones a little bit for the first time in order to get better and more efficient with their skills, which is what a lot of people enjoy and care about. The way I see it is, if you're going to be riding like a snail and have everyone else have to pass you every lap because you're worried about your fairings on a closed and regulated circuit, go back to riding on the expressway and save your attendance for someone else. Don't get me wrong, nobody ever needs to push way outside their comfort zones and they should ride at their own pace, but eventually it'll get pretty old when you're still running in the novice groups all the time and some middle aged lady is passing you on her ninja 250. If I crashed my track bodywork I would be even more devastated considering they needed custom paint and one off applications to accommodate aftermarket parts/harnesses and hardware that cost thousands of dollars. I'm not going to not ride it because of that though, **** happens and insurance is a good thing to have.
I never said you couldn't ride fast. You are putting words in my mouth again.

The point was that if you are going to take your street bike to the track, use whatever sense you may have (some seem to lack any at all) when you do it. If you want to ride like an ******* or show off to your friends you are asking for it. And that echos my first post.

If you are sensible and use your skill instead of your balls, crashes become much less likely. Especially at the level that most will be riding with their street bike on track
 

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We all have a different level of aggressiveness when it comes to riding. Best advice I've ever received (after a bad crash at the track caused by the guy I was passing lowsiding into me)... If you can live without the track, do it. But if you are going to then ride aggressively on the street, bring it to the track instead.

We all need to ride smart and build skills, and some track newbies are clearly too aggressive. But anyone who rides track is a bit aggressive in their riding. So it's hard to chastise people for crashing... Some push the edge harder, some less so, but we all push the edge. That's how we learn to be better and, ultimately, safer.
 

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We all have a different level of aggressiveness when it comes to riding. Best advice I've ever received (after a bad crash at the track caused by the guy I was passing lowsiding into me)... If you can live without the track, do it. But if you are going to then ride aggressively on the street, bring it to the track instead.

We all need to ride smart and build skills, and some track newbies are clearly too aggressive. But anyone who rides track is a bit aggressive in their riding. So it's hard to chastise people for crashing... Some push the edge harder, some less so, but we all push the edge. That's how we learn to be better and, ultimately, safer.
I can generally agree with that.

The point I was making was more geared towards people beginning to ride at the track, as they would be the most likely to do it on their street bike.

Most crashes from new riders at the track are 100% preventable. They are typically from getting overzealous on the straightaways with no braking plans for the next corner. Or just being heavy on the throttle with cold tires.
 

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Most crashes from new riders at the track are 100% preventable. They are typically from getting overzealous on the straightaways with no braking plans for the next corner. Or just being heavy on the throttle with cold tires.

Generally the same mistakes of unforced crashes of street riders. Overcooking corner entry & hamfisted throttle mid corner & exit.


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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I think a lot of street crashes are from panicking and grabbing a mitt full of brakes.

Either way, the track is a place to learn, not a place to show off.
 

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We are saying the same thing. I'm probably one of those who was a bit over zealous in my first few track days. Would much rather learn hard lessons with a low side on the track than on the road. Not to the point where I was a danger to others, but I could have learned from your advice in the early days.
 
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