Honda CBR 600RR Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
655 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Today was my offical first day riding a cbr. I came to a turn where there was water and i got a bit nervous. My question is at slow and high speeds what is the best way to turn in puddles?
Let me say that i am very new to riding ( i have taken the CHP courses but thats the majority of my riding).
Thanks for everyones input and help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,456 Posts
Be extra careful and look at the pavement for manholes and the white paint strips. Those while wet will help you lowside anyday. I hit a white line at a light and it slipped and spun out i just let off the throttle and eased back into it and it saved it, but wet manholes are way worse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
906 Posts
I rate you should (could?) ride at 90% of normal (normal = not psycho) riding pace. Confidence is the key. I did a track day in the wet on a really slippery surface, and found out that you can still ride really fast as long as you don't get cocky and are attentive to how your bike is responding to the road surface.

That being said, I ride a little more cautiously after the first spurt of rain, coz thats when all the diesel and crap gets lifted off the road. Also, coming up to traffic circles, 4-way stops and yields where there are lots of painted road markings etc. Changing lanes while turning - expect a little slide if you do over the lane divider. But don't panic - when you get back onto the tar, the bike rights itself!

If you were referring to a lone puddle on an otherwise dry road, just try to avoid it I suppose. It could be a water-filled pothole or actually a diesel or oil spill.

Otherwise pick the bike up slightly (if at low speed) or keep doing what you're doing (if at high speed). When riding fast, I think you should get through it quickly enough for the bike not to slip too much. I reckon that the consequences of you panicking about the puddle could be more severe than riding through the puddle itself.

BTW. I also fallen on a manhole cover in the rain. Sucked ass - lesson learned. Also saved two lowsides in succession after approaching a traffic circle and riding over the markings, and a 10kph highside pulling away from a zebra / pedestrian crossing in the rain. I now avoid the paint if I can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
599 Posts
It depends on the surface. There is a parking lot at my school that is blacktop with like a million coats of sealer. When it rains it is a skating rink. I ride slow in 1st with my feet dragging till I get out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
It depends on the surface. There is a parking lot at my school that is blacktop with like a million coats of sealer. When it rains it is a skating rink. I ride slow in 1st with my feet dragging till I get out.
You also never know if there is a big pothole in that puddle. :73:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
470 Posts
Yeah, what sucks about the road markings is that they are slippery... it is because the paint has glass beads mixed in to make it reflective. Some of the things like crosswalks are a vinyl that is applied with heat and it is way more slippery then the glass/paint mix.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
51,143 Posts
1.Some riders think when the rain starts to come down, so should the garage door, tucking the bike away until the sun shines again the following spring. Unfortunately, they're missing one of the best motorcycling experiences. Riding in the rain can be fun as long as you know what to expect and how to change your riding accordingly.

First of all, clothe yourself properly. A good rainsuit, gloves, boots, and perhaps an electric vest, can keep even the most persistent storm from soaking you. But most importantly, you must change the way you handle the motorcycle. Throttle adjustments need to be made smoothly and in small increments; use less lean angle; gradually apply your brakes and get your braking done early.



2. Be wary of intersections when riding in wet conditions. We all know about the oils in the pavement that surface after a rain, but what about the oil that was already there? Any place in the road where cars come to a stop will have a higher concentration of the slick stuff. The rain makes it worse. You may not be able to spot this while riding, so it's best to decrease your speed when approaching intersections. Don't run yellow lights, because if you have to turn or brake quickly chances are you'll encounter a traction problem. When stopped at a red light, check the rear-view mirror for cars that could slide into you from behind. Also, double your following distance so as not to be surprised by cars stopping suddenly in front of you.



3. Two things we've noticed that drastically reduce traction during wet weather are manhole covers and sealer pavement. Both of these are like black ice when it's raining. When traveling in a straight line they pose less of a threat, but be sure to scan well ahead before you turn the bike to enter an intersection. Get off the brakes early and take a line that's clear of traction-limiting obstructions. Sealer pavement is usually darker than the surrounding blacktop. It can be found in town or on rural roads, and it comes in large patches or smaller sections where it's used for crack repair. If you encounter either of these traction inhibitors resist braking or accelerating hard. If you have to change your line or turn over a greasy section, keep your hands relaxed on the clip-ons and don't lean the bike any more than necessary.



4. Although this may seem obvious, it is amazing how many people we see riding in an area of the lane that is wet even though an adjacent area is dry. Dry pavement offers superior traction and maneuverability, so make sure you continually place yourself in the driest section of the lane. If you can force yourself to slow down and be relaxed, you will find that rain riding (and even touring) can teach you how to be a better and more confident rider. City riding in stormy weather is by far the most nerve-racking, but just because the clouds roll in doesn't mean you can't ride almost every day. Remembering a few pointers can make riding in the rain easier and safer than you think. And besides, who wants to garage their motorcycle for five months out of the year?
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top