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I had trouble considering where to post this thread, but it seems to be a mix of general discussion, crashes, and rider tips, so I simply defaulted to general discussion. Here goes. So I live in LA, and I commute on the 405 from Palos Verdes to the west side every day. I notice as many as 2 - 10 astounding cager accidents a week during the course of my normal commute. Today I saw a 3 car, one flipped, one on its side ... all sorts of bad stuff. In any case, every once in a while I come upon a motorcycle accident. I am not actually witnessing the accident, but I ride up to it after the fact. Every time I have come across one I've always either gotten there after the police / rescue, or there is one other civilian motorcyclist stopping who was unrelated to the accident. I read some forums I found on google about what the second unrelated motorcyclist might be there to help with after the accident, such as to make sure people don't remove helmets, or to call rescue, etc.. What I'm not sure of is how many bystander motorcyclist should stop. As I've to date always been the 3rd bike or later to pass (second potential bystander) I've never stopped. I'm somewhat torn between having too many bystanders versus providing additional help to the first bystander. Another thing is I'm sort of worried if I end up being the first potential bystander in the future, and I haven't yet stopped to help before, I might not be as helpful as I otherwise might be. I heard from a particularly unaware co-worker who happened to be smart enough to recount his own at-fault (in a cage) accident with a motorcycle that a large crowd of motorcycles stopped. In any case, if anyone has something to say on good practices for stopping, and how many people should stop, etc., I'd be happy to hear. Also interesting would be some info from people who have stopped, and their personal experiences. People who ride in LA, or in locations with similar cagers are especially encouraged to share.

Cheers,
David
 

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Well, there is no "proper" or "correct" amount. I have only been around for one motorcycle accident, luckily the guy wasn't seriously injured. However, being a certified EMT in the state of illinois(altho I am currently not employed as one) i feel the need to. There really isn't much you can do, except for call 911, comfort the victim. Most importantly if you do show up to a scene, regardless of whether the person seems okay, insist that they do not move, especially head/neck. There can be a severe spinal injury, that the victim may be unaware, especially if their adrenaline is pumping. Moral support is really all you can do. In Illinois, even though I am an EMT/soon to be firefighter we are not legally bound to stop, unless on duty. It really is up to you if you should. It isnt for some people to stop at an accident, you will see some disturbing things, that may cross you mentally for awhile. There is nothing wrong with stopping and being the second bystander, the 3rd, 4th unless emergency personnel are already there and say otherwise. The biggest thing, and they teach this to emts/paramedics/police/fire(any emergency personnel for that matter), your personal safety is #1 priority. So avoid putting yourself in danger.

Part of the reason that makes me feel the need to stop is, too many people go by and think "the next person will stop", bystander effect. It's pretty safe to say, wouldn't you hope that someone would stop if you went down? That's the way I look at it. Who knows, maybe you'll be the one who saves this persons life.
Hope this helps, maybe give some peace at mind! =)
 

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apologies for the long post.

when I crashed earlier this year, the first person who stopped happened to be in a cage. he asked if I were ok, and still having the adrenaline rushing through the veins, I told him I was ok. the next person to stop was in a big tractor trailer type truck. he asked if I needed any help, (adrenaline still surging) I just asked for him to help me pick up the bike (in a ditch) so I could limp it down to where I can get reception and just call for a tow.

then I saw my knee.

got that queasy feeling in the stomach, and told the guys (by then another truck had stopped to help) that I was just going to take a seat. luckily though, an off duty officer was going through the mountains, stopped to assess everything, and radioed in my location to local fire.

long story short: no motorcycles stopped to help, but none were present when I crashed. after being initially checked out, the Harley's that did ride by slowed down to ask if everything was ok, then left after being told I was good.

fast forward a few months, and I'm cruising home from work, deciding to stop in Berkeley to get out of traffic and get some water. as I'm riding up the off ramp, I notice another rider behind me. no big deal. I make the right semi-sweeper, and as I'm checking my mirror to merge into traffic, I see the rider behind me low siding. I immediately pull over as far right as possible (I'm on an overpass with no shoulder) and run to the downed biker. thankfully, a pedestrian also witnessed the crash and was much closer than I. the two of them were able to get the bike out of the way of traffic by the time I reached them. after talking with the rider to make sure he was cohesive, I asked him if he'd like for me to call for an ambulance. he agreed, I made the call, then I ran back to my bike to move it out the way/bring it closer to the scene. fire responded rather quickly, and after returning, I asked PD if they needed any statements or anything from me. they declined, and I was on my merry way.

so my advice to you, it doesn't hurt to stop. make sure it's safe to do so, then check the rider. keep them calm and conscious. if you're the first, wait until fire arrives.


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this is how i deal with any accident. if i witness it i stick around. if i drive by and there is no one helping, i stop. if there is a crowd of people i keep going on my way or if everyone is out of the vehicles and standing around i leave.

i am a qualified first aider. with years of training as well as a background as a mechanic who operated tow trucks. it doesnt take me more then a quick look to asses the vehicle damage and the people to decide if i would be helpful or just another person in the way.
 

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What others have said. If EMS/Fire is already on scene, odds are that more people on scene will just get in the way and add to the chaos. If it looks like you could lend a hand, there is nothing wrong with stopping. Just make sure to not put yourself in danger. Find a good, safe location to pull over and be seen. The last thing you want to happen is getting yourself hurt and making the situation even worse.

It is never a bad idea to get some first aid training. As motorcycle riders, we are bound to see a fellow rider go down sooner or later if we stick with it for any amount of time. Physical injury assessment skills are vital for immediate care. If you can spot an injury prior to EMS arrival, you just saved that ambulance crew precious minutes so they can start treating an injury right away.
 

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What others have said. If EMS/Fire is already on scene, odds are that more people on scene will just get in the way and add to the chaos. If it looks like you could lend a hand, there is nothing wrong with stopping. Just make sure to not put yourself in danger. Find a good, safe location to pull over and be seen. The last thing you want to happen is getting yourself hurt and making the situation even worse.

It is never a bad idea to get some first aid training. As motorcycle riders, we are bound to see a fellow rider go down sooner or later if we stick with it for any amount of time. Physical injury assessment skills are vital for immediate care. If you can spot an injury prior to EMS arrival, you just saved that ambulance crew precious minutes so they can start treating an injury right away.
we always suggest that during the m1 exit course.

ive done a multiple injury triage, and the firefighter thanked me for the work i did. there were 5 people and 3 injured, and a minivan about to catch fire. it was crazy.. raining on a blind curve. i was not involved bot was pulled over on teh side of the road before the van stopped spinning.

if you have enough training you will go to work on an accident scene without even thinking. you will follow the steps rather quickly.
 

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we always suggest that during the m1 exit course.

ive done a multiple injury triage, and the firefighter thanked me for the work i did. there were 5 people and 3 injured, and a minivan about to catch fire. it was crazy.. raining on a blind curve. i was not involved bot was pulled over on teh side of the road before the van stopped spinning.

if you have enough training you will go to work on an accident scene without even thinking. you will follow the steps rather quickly.
this.

we get SABC (self aid buddy care) training every year (or every 2 years, I can't remember). after doing it repetitively, it becomes second nature and you're already helping before you even realize it.


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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks.

Wow. Thanks everyone for the great replies. Good info about how many people should stop, pulling over safely, and the recommended safety training. Thanks everyone, much appreciated!
 
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