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Only problem is I dont have the know-how nor the tools. I hate paying people for things I know I could probably do. As far as the know-how, I love the write-ups here so thats not a problem.

Today I just bought a metric set of Allen keys from 1-10mm. A buddy of mine helped me take off my slipon few weeks ago and today I managed to put it back on myself. I put the tail together, rear set and the pipe on. Yea, not a huge accomplishment for the hands-on guys but I was happy I could do it myself.

Was wondering what other basic tools I would need for future jobs. Would a basic beginner set from Sears do the trick? Or, if you have a set that you use and it serves you well for work you do on your bike, please let me know which kit you have. Thanks in advance
 
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Dude i have built several engines and cars with a crappy stanley set of sockets.. i dont own anything else.. I do however didnt cheap out on the torque wrench i own(snap on).. Just treat ur tools right and they will last for a while...
 

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If you're in need of a cheap run of the mill tool set, many sets can be had through Harbor Freight tools. Also, that's where I get a lot of my specialty items like piston spring compressors, lock ring pliers, bearing press, calipers, micrometers, dial indicators, steel stamps, cable lube tools, etc. Their hand tools have a lifetime warranty so if you break it, not only aren't you at much of a loss, they replace it. I have Craftsman tools of my own but wouldn't hesitate to buy a tool kit from them. They have ranging quality so be sure to commit to what you need-you get what you pay for.

Well I guess someone beat me to to it. A good torque wrench won't be cheap but they're worth their weight in gold. Make sure you research the proper way to take care of a torque wrench or you will just have improper torque per setting. (spring fatigue)
 

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You can pick up a set of Craftsmen sockets and a ratchet from Sears for around $20 on sale. They're good tools and have lifetime warranty. Get a copy of the service manual. You can either buy one or download a pdf version. Just start with basic maintenance like oil changes, changing brake pads, and go from ther as you gain more experience.
 

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to caviot that, i broke 2 harbor freight torque wrenches taking the rear wheel off my buddys 09 r6. i also have a snap on. expensive though
Well there's your problem right there. You don't use torque wrenches to loosen bolt, especially if the bolts are stubborn. Buy a simple wrench and a cheater bar if you need it.
 

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depends on how much deeper you plan on going. For surface stuff like fairings, changing oil, replacing brake pads etc. a cheap set of sockets, some cheap screw drivers and a couple crescent wrenches will take you a long way. If you plan on getting more into the internals of the bike there are a few more specialty tools you will need.
 
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cheap breaker bar is a cast pipe from home depot!!! about 4 feet long, just make sure your socket wrench fits in the end... that **** will break any bolt you need!!!!
 

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i have a mixture of craftsman,stanley, and husky sockets. craftsman half inch and 3/8 ratchets.

a mix of stanley screwdrivers
metric allen keys
craftsman torque wrench

there the basics, i can basically get anything done with that. if you have cash, get a decent air compressor.

then you have options, like impact guns, air drills, paint sprayers, and all that good stuff.

i worked on cars along time before motorcycles so my tool collection was pretty much all there, besides a few specialty tools and sockets. :thumbup:
 

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In your situation I think the first tool you need is the Service manual. Bikes are actually easy to work on. You need to get comfortable with tools and and undestanding how things work before you get into the bigger jobs. Watch videos as well
 

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Discussion Starter #12
depends on how much deeper you plan on going. For surface stuff like fairings, changing oil, replacing brake pads etc. a cheap set of sockets, some cheap screw drivers and a couple crescent wrenches will take you a long way. If you plan on getting more into the internals of the bike there are a few more specialty tools you will need.
Not plan on going deep at all. Just oil changes, brakes, taking fairings off, maybe headers and slipon, tail. Nothing much more than that honestly.

I've seen my friends work on my bike and other bikes so I'd like to say I'm pretty familiar with the basics but would just need to the tools of the trade.
 

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Well there's your problem right there. You don't use torque wrenches to loosen bolt, especially if the bolts are stubborn. Buy a simple wrench and a cheater bar if you need it.
You beat me to it. He must have not seen the paper they stick in the case that says NOT FOR BREAKING LOOSE BOLTS/NUTS
 

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In your situation I think the first tool you need is the Service manual. Bikes are actually easy to work on. You need to get comfortable with tools and and undestanding how things work before you get into the bigger jobs. Watch videos as well
If you search the site you can find a service manual download link. You should be fine with a set of metric sockets and allen keys. You don't need a fancy set of sockets, but once you get some nice allen wrenches you'll love then and not strip them anymore.
 

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I've always told my buddies, If you can ride a motorcycle, you can fix one. Props to you for wanting to work on your own stuff. You will get a great deal of satisfaction from it.
 

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I'm gonna tell u one of the first things u need that I also need myself are some bike stands. I can not stand working on my bike anymore just for that reason. I'm waiting for the new York bike show so I can pick up some pitbull stands there. They had a good price last year when I went but dum me did not buy them
 

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I'm gonna tell u one of the first things u need that I also need myself are some bike stands. I can not stand working on my bike anymore just for that reason. I'm waiting for the new York bike show so I can pick up some pitbull stands there. They had a good price last year when I went but dum me did not buy them

save some money and buy TRex. Unless you can get the bulls for less, which I doubt. Don't worry, your bike isnt going to fall over on them. You wouldnt believe how many people use them
 

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+1 on the metric sockets and metric allen wrenches. i started my first semester of motorcycle marine technician school and they gave me a huge tool list. the instructor said he will not allow taiwan tools in the shop because they can actually cause damage to the unit you are working on, due to the actual pressure points of the sockets. up till now i had a set of walmart tools and they did fine for small cosmetic stuff but now that i own snap on i can tell a huge difference. the sales rep gives school student a 55% discount or i would have craftsman. Good luck it is alot of fun and the satisfaction is awesome
 

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I have a Metrinch set that I've owned for over a decade. They fit both metric and standard. Excellent quality, they've survived 10 years of racing and still going strong.

http://www.metrinch.tv/

As far working on your bike start with small things like taking off the body work and changing your oil and oil filter then slowly work your way up to bigger tasks. You'll be surprised how fast you learn.
 
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