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Me and a Harley buddy were talking about this at work.

He thinks sportbikers think they are too cool to wave at Harleys.
I told him Harley guys are assholes and thats why they don't wave to sportbikers.

If I wave at a Harley and I know he sees and doesn't return, I give the one finger salute.

So how many "wave" to fellow cyclists?
Its more of an upside down peace, signifying two on the ground ie be safe.


He was saying I bought a sportbike cause I couldn't afford a real bike(HD). I told him "When you redline yours at 15K and can do 60 in first, come talk to me"

600RR FTW
 

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Fabulous Disaster
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I used to wave to everyone, but after getting snubbed by enough HD riders wearing "Brain buckets" with their noses in the air. I've basically sworn it off. I'll return any wave I get, even if it's from a scooter, but I've found that waving to cruisers has been a waste of time for me.
 

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knights of cydonia
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I two fingers down everybody on two wheels, even scooters because they're taking the risk too. But I've been snubbed so many times by HDs so I wait until they wave first then I'll go. If not then it's whatever.
 

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At a press conference late Monday, the CEO of Johnson Marine, makers of Johnson outboard marine engines and other recreational equipment, unveiled a new line of heavyweight cruiser style motorcycles designed to compete head to head with industry leader Harley-Davidson.

Peter Long, Johnson brands marketing manager said, "We have studied the market and determined that Harley, while highly successful, has narrowly missed the mark when targeting motorcycle buyers". Long added, "We at Johnson are convinced that our product hits the target dead center and promises to draw sales away from Harley-Davidson in a way no other motorcycle has been able to accomplish".

The new line of bikes, marketed under the name Big Johnson Motorcycles, will, according to Long, deliver what Harley has only promised. "Our research show that this, a Big Johnson, is what Harley buyers are really after".

At the unveiling of the new line Monday, several current Harley owners agreed. "When I bought my Harley, what I really needed was a Big Johnson," said one Harley owner." But I see now that riding a Harley is no replacement for having a Big Johnson."

Manager Long also said that his company would follow the lead of Harley-Davidson and cash in on a huge market for non-motorcycle related products. "We realize that not every guy can have a Big Johnson," said Long, "But image is very important to people. If they don't have a Big Johnson, they at least want to project the image of having one."

Asked if he anticipated Big Johnsons showing up in the hands of Harley owners, Long said it was unlikely. "I just don't see the need to have a Harley if you have a Big Johnson," he said. "And I can't imagine someone who spends all their resources to acquire a Harley having a Big Johnson. I think it boils down to this - You either have a Harley, or you have a Big Johnson, but you are not likely to have both." "Given the choice," said Long, "I think most guys will opt for the Big Johnson."

Another force driving sales for the company will come from women. A survey of the wives and girlfriends of nearly 1,000 potential motorcycle buyers indicates less than 5% would approve of their partner spending $15,000 on a Harley Davidson. But, when asked if they would be willing to pay the same amount of money to get their partner a Big Johnson, nearly 4 out 5 thought that would be money well spent.

One female present at the product unveiling was quoted as saying, "There is no way I will let Lonnie drop 15 grand on another one of those Harleys, but 15 grand to get him a Big Johnson? Well, that's something we could both enjoy, and it's something he really needs."

Carla Roundheel, manager of the dealership network now being established, said her motto is simple. "I service what we sell." Big Johnson Motorcycles will be traded on the New York stock exchange under the abbreviation PNSNV.
 

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I have mixed feelings about waving to scooters. I've waved in the past but with hesitation. I wave to anyone else harley or sport. It makes me a little peeved when HD riders don't wave back. I tried to explain to a buddy of mine why I wave to people I don't know. The courage it takes to get on two wheels in the world of four means you've earned my respect.

lol over the top " riding everyday means i'm in the war for my life, and we are the soldiers cages are the enemy's "

cheesy but true.

two fingers outwards is what I do, didn't know it meant two on the ground.
 

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lol
usually nod to other bikers.not so many hd around during the week but these homos with their facking vespas.
MOVE BIATCH...
 

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I don't do the "two-fingers out" thing because that's too HD for me... I use my left hand and just hold it up

I wave to the Harleys mainly for the irony factor... most of the time, they don't wave back. Here is a group of riders that pride themselves on being more mature than sport bike riders, most of them even having gray hair and beards, yet I have never seen a cruiser wearing more gear than I do and more than half of them don't wave back to me. If they're so immature, stubborn and ignorant that they can't wave to another motorcyclist just because they have a different taste in motorcycles, then they're really only proving their own stupidity.
 

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i always wave.. no scooters though... alot of harley guys dont wave back but im sure some of them didnt see me, but some are just asses also
 

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Man I posted on similar thread about the same thing a while back.... I used to wave to everyone when I first started riding, but man its kinda discouraging waving at HD guys when 95% of them won't wave back, so I stopped.... But after I read that forum, I just wave to everyone now. Nothing has changed....Everybody on sport bikes wave back, and 95% of HD guys don't wave back. I wave to everyone, if they're too big and bad to wave back, that's their problem.
 

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Fyi

Secret Motorcycle Hand Greetings: Revealed!


#fullpost { DISPLAY: inline}Those of you who ride motorcycles will know exactly what I'm talking about here. Those of you who don't - will hopefully learn something.

I'm referring to that secret "wave" that oncoming bikers may or may not flash each other as they pass on the highway. Oh sure, it seems customary enough - two fellow riders politely saying "hi" to each other as they approach... but is it? Is it really that simple? Actually it's not.

I've been riding a motorcycle my entire adult life and I've been paying attention. And if you think you're going to get a salutation from just any biker coming your way, then you're wrong. Believe it or not, there are some very subliminal and undocumented rules regarding this situation - and I'm going to share them with you now.

Here's how it works:

First of all, we'll need to establish some terminology to make this tutorial easier to follow.

The person initiating the wave will herefor be referred to as the "initiator". The other person will then automatically be known as the "receiver," and if he responds to the wave, will also be known as the "replier." Note that any reference to said replier assumes he is also the receiver and therefore will not also be referred to as the receiver because otherwise he would have to be known as the receiver and the replier - which just doesn't make any sense.

Next, to avoid any unnecessary political or grammar faux pas, all motorcyclists from this point on will be referred to as "riders" and all persons shall be referred to in the male context, just to make it easier.

Ok, now on to the tutorial...

Equity and the Odds of Engagement

The odds of receiving a wave from an oncoming biker are first and foremost governed by the "laws of equity." This means that the more things you have in common with him the better chance he will engage as either the initiator or the replier.

There are basically three categories in the laws of equity:

1. Brand equity. This means that if you both are riding the same brand of bike, the odds of a wave transaction are increased.
2. Style equity. If you both are riding the same "type" of bike, such as chopper, rocket or touring motorcycle, then your odds are increased as well.
3. Helmet equity. If you both are either wearing or not wearing helmets - odds increased again.

To further illustrate this concept:
IF you both are riding hardtail Harleys and not wearing helmets, the odds of a hand gesture between the two of you are VERY high. Conversely, the odds of a nonhelmeted hardtail rider waving to a helmeted Suzuki rocket rider are almost next to none.

The Big Five
When a fellow biker is approaching, his left arm and hand will tell the story. Whether he is the initiator or the replier, the signals are the same. Following are the five main hand gestures you may encounter:

1. The Nothing - This is the "default" hand position of most cross-encounters. Simply leaving his left hand on the handle bar can mean anything from "not paying attention to the fact you're approaching" to "I see you but I'm not interested in exchanging a greeting" - to the harsher, "I see you but since we don't enjoy any 'equity,' I'm not going to acknowledge your existence." Of course since no words are ever exchanged to clarify, all the rider can do is simply speculate.

2. The Two-finger Flip - The most casual AND most common acknowledgement. Left hand still on the handgrip, but the index and middle fingers raised briefly. This one simply says "dude, how's it going?" Most of the time the receiver will respond just out of courtesy. Of course the whole issue of who goes first really boils down to nothing more than a game of greeting chicken - or whoever's in the better mood at time.

3. The Big One - This is the granddaddy of all greetings. Left hand down off of the handlebar and out to the side. Fingers may either show a "peace" sign or be spread open palm side out. Here, the initiator is sending a clear signal that he acknowledges you. Not replying to this blatant plea for hospitality may be considered rude - and could possibly be interpreted as a strong message of inequity.

4. The Dis - Left hand down and resting on the thigh. This could be viewed as a request to treat the opposing party as a hostile witness - ESPECIALLY if it is moved there while you are approaching. Dating back to the days when rival motorcycle gangs roamed the streets, this signal indicated disrespect to the other rider(s) and was clearly meant as negative and often times led to confrontation. Today, however, the old cultural significance has been lost, and could simply just mean your arm is tired and resting on your leg.

5. The Geek - Left hand raised high in the air as if to say, "Hi mom!" This one is specifically reserved for the new rider, who is "SO excited to be one of the gang!" Also may be seen being used by Moped or scooter riders. Recommendation: Just don't.


So there they are. All the secrets behind those mysterious motorcycle hand greetings revealed (not to be confused with the standard hand "turn" signals). So the next time you approach an oncoming rider, take note. He could be sending you a very intentional message!

Or not.
 

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Wave preference:

Motorcycles (all)
Scooters (will wave back)

Although I'm thinking of doing the wave back for H-D guys. The Goldwing and BMW crowd always wave back, and sometimes wave first! Fooking cool!
 
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