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Discussion Starter #1
Hello I recently bought a 2015 Yamaha r3 as my first bike and I was wondering what I should expect or look out for when riding on the road. I already know how to drive manual I had a manual atv and drive several of my friends dirtbikes but that’s pretty much all I know is to drive manual lol. So what should I expect when riding on the street?
 

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FWIW....get full gear..and you'll find that cars don't see you.

Immediately enroll in an MSF course is the best advice I can give you....are you fully licensed?

With your riding history, you made a good choice with the r3.

A smaller bike is easier to learn on and maintain.

Less $$$ to keep running also.

GL!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yup I got gear and I am signed up for the safety course. Thanks for the advice man!
 

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FWIW....get full gear..and you'll find that cars don't see you.

Immediately enroll in an MSF course is the best advice I can give you....are you fully licensed?

With your riding history, you made a good choice with the r3.

A smaller bike is easier to learn on and maintain.

Less $$$ to keep running also.

GL!
and yes I do have my license
 

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One thing that really helps is to ride a bicycle, either road or mountain.

this will help your core strength and fitness, sharpen 2 wheel responses, and if you're around cars will sharpen your survival skills as well!

Good Luck and happy riding!
 

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One thing that really helps is to ride a bicycle, either road or mountain.

this will help tour core strength and fitness, sharpen 2 wheel responses, and if your around cars will sharpen your survival skills as well!

Good Luck and happy riding!
Thanks man!
 

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Watch every car around you and expect them to not see you/cut you off.
In sticky situations always look where you want to go, not at the danger you want to avoid.
After youve been riding a while and feel comfortable, be extra careful. That’s when your most likely to let the thrill of speed get you in over your head. Overconfidence can be dangerous, know your limits.
 

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When approaching stopped cars at intersections and you are riding on the street passing them by, watch the cars front tires for movement. This will give you a better reaction time and register in your mind faster if the car is going to pull out in front of you.
 

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Wait, so you don't have to do a motorbike theory and practical test to get a motorbike licence to ride on the road?!?
Mind blown.

I heard about that MSF safety course thing, but always thought that was additional training after already getting your bike license from being taught/trained how to ride on the road

:dontknow: crazy.


I'll let the Americans best guide you how to ride on your specific roads (no point in me telling you how best to deal with roundabouts as you guys don't have them, or for filtering as I don't think you're allowed to do that either), but universal guidance for road riding is to always put your safety first. Don't take unnecessary risks.

Keep your eyes up, looking ahead and scanning from the horizon back. You'll spot hazards earlier if you're being observant, and keeping your head up will improve low speed balance too.
Always be mindful of who/what is behind you too, and whenever making any movement more than a bike's width to your left/right, take a quick "lifesaver" glance over your shoulder to check whether another bike/bicycle/car has suddenly crept up on you and is in your blindspot.

In advanced riding, we get taught to always use a system called IPSGA. It might be a bit much for a new rider, but it's useful knowledge to have to assist while riding.
Be it for taking a corner, coming up to a traffic light, passing an intersection, about to overtake, etc.

I nformation - being observant and gather information from road signs and everything else going on around you.
P osition - position yourself appropriately on the road.
S peed - ensure you're in the correct speed for the situation. Always travel at the speed at which you can safely stop in the distance that you can see to be clear.
G ear - ensure you're in the correct gear for the situation.
A ction - After completing the first 4 checks, you should be able to safely complete the action.


And ride safe.
 
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