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Discussion Starter #1
I'm curious what part of the turn-in sequence you guys get off the seat. I like to stay on it during braking to keep off the handlebars, but I also like to brake into and let off through the turn-in, which pretty much leaves no ideal time for me to worry about shifting my weight so I kinda wind up doing it different every time and I want to get a solid order to practice better. Just wondering what you guys do.
 

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brake before turn, hang off, turn in. i wouldnt let off the brakes mid turn....unweighting the front completely will make it wash out.
 

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I'm curious what part of the turn-in sequence you guys get off the seat. I like to stay on it during braking to keep off the handlebars, but I also like to brake into and let off through the turn-in, which pretty much leaves no ideal time for me to worry about shifting my weight so I kinda wind up doing it different every time and I want to get a solid order to practice better. Just wondering what you guys do.
It's all personal preference, there is no 'correct' way, but there are some wrong ways! LOL

Me, I like to set up as early as I comfortably can.

I will set up right before my braking marker, so I am on one side, yet still tucked in. When I hit my braking marker I sit up, stick the knee out (but because I was already set up to hang off I can immediately GRAB the brakes as hard as I can without upsetting the chassis), one I hit my turn on point I gradually let off the brake, I like to trail brake to keep the suspension smooth. So I am still on the brakes and I am now leading the bike into the corner.

As I hit the apex I will start to roll on the throttle, just lightly before I start to let off the brakes that last little bit, do it smooth enough and you can transfer your weight at the exact time you unload the front. Preventing a tuck.

It's practice and preference...
 

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Setting up early is great when you have the time, but if it is a sequence of corners, this becomes impossible. So as a result, I've tried to have my off the bike position lead me into the lean if you will....all one fluid motion. This also helps me to get the right lean angle without overstear....something I would let my throttle take care of usually. Now when I am at the track and have the time to set up I sometimes practice the 'all-in-one' motion to make it more fluid when I need it at other parts of the track. Here in FL I have days to set up when I am on the road so it isn't as much of a concern there, just at the track.
 

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yea that is true, it does depend on the track, and even the corner of the track...

At Jennings I tend to tend up early on the hard(er) braking corners, and virtually no set up on the ones you just lightly trail brake into.
 

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Do whatever feels the smoothest and changes the way the suspension is set in that very moment the least. Like others said, there isnt one correct way but there certainly are major things that you should not do, like chop the throttle on/off or go wacky with the brakes. Also, dont freak if/when you start dragging knee puck!
 

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Every instructor I have worked with and the racers on TV all setup for turns as early as possible, usually just before getting off of the gas and starting to brake and downshift. Watch the MotoGP butt cam and even the other camera angles and you will see that they are always shifted off of the seat before they start braking and downshifting. Another thing that they all do is when you have multiple left turns in a row coming up they stay off of the seat, they do not move off, get back on, move off, get back on, move off.....

This is what I have been taught by multiple instructors at different schools (some will do it slightly earlier or slightly later but none of them teach moving around on the seat when braking, downshifting or turning).
 

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Also, try not to put a lot of weight to the clip-ons. Do your best to keep the weight on your legs and rearsets. It also makes it easier to shift weight when dealing with switchback style corners.
 

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Not right now chief, im in the f'ing zone
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Just be smooth. Slow in, fast out. It is like that in every type of racing. Some people may not be the fastest people around but they are putting down faster lap times because they are smooth and finess about it
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Yeah I guess getting it done before braking is better than messing with it around the turn-in like everyone's saying.

One other thing, some of you brought up esses, how much gas do you guys put on through those transitions? I was reading in one of those books you should be pegged if the curves allow it but I'm always afraid of the front lifting and coming down wrong (it always wobbles even at like 70 or 80% throttle, and I wonder what'd happen w/o the magic HESD) or even if it doesn't come up, how do you have enough traction in the front for counter steering?
 

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Yeah I guess getting it done before braking is better than messing with it around the turn-in like everyone's saying.
Absolutely!

One other thing, some of you brought up esses, how much gas do you guys put on through those transitions? I was reading in one of those books you should be pegged if the curves allow it but I'm always afraid of the front lifting and coming down wrong (it always wobbles even at like 70 or 80% throttle, and I wonder what'd happen w/o the magic HESD) or even if it doesn't come up, how do you have enough traction in the front for counter steering?
Totally depends on the corner!

I wouldn't worry to much about lifting the front... It's more of a rare occurrence than an issue... I mean, yea you'll loft it up now and then. But what happens is as you get faster you end up almost always leaning one way or the other. This allows you to carry a lot of corner speed through corners that are more like kinks...

You are using your body to steer (or lead) the bike through the corner. The same will happen when the front is airbourne. With you hanging off say the left side, you will continue to turn left. As long as it doesn't get to high! (which is rare on the track on a 600)
 

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Quick % question.

What are your guys percentages b/n input into handles (countersteering) / weight on pegs/ weight on seat/ and lean while cornering? If it is possible to equate it into some kind of ratio.:icon_stud
 

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Every trackday I focus one NO bar input! Completely steering and adjusting my corning with weighting the pegs.

Weight into the corning, adjusting lines mid corner and weighting the outside on the exits. The less bar input the better!
 
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