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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, I know this question has been answered a thousand times before, but I'm keen to know what people think about my situation and any advice you think might be relevant.

Not to bore you all too much, but just a bit of back ground info. I am 33 years old and have a partner and a son. I have been riding for only 1 year on a Honda CB400. In Australia we have to start out on low powered bikes for a year and then we can get a open class license. I live in a very small town in the middle of nowhere. I mainly use the bike to commute 18kms to work and back, although there are some great open, windy roads with very little traffic on. I have currently done about 8000kms on the bike. I have bought and read lots of books (Total Control, Twist of the Wrist 1 & 2, Proficient Motorcycling) and every time I ride I try and practice different skills which i have read about.

I can now purchase any bike i like and my dream bike is a 600RR. I was intending to get the new CBR650FA, as it is right in the middle of the CB400 power and the RR power (38kw, 64kw & 88kw). I was intending to ride this for another year or two and then upgrade to a RR.

That was until I told my plan to a few of my riding buddies and they think I should go straight for the RR, they believe that there is no point getting the CBR650FA and then selling it again in a year. I am a careful kind of guy so would like a few more opinions on what the right move should be.

Also if anyone can give me any specific advice on what i should be practicing to be able to move up to the RR that would be very much appreciated.

And, to go back to the title question when is the right time to upgrade?

I read on here that if you have to ask if you are ready for a super sport, your not! So after all that I have probably answered my own question!!!

Sorry if this is overly long, but thanks so much for the time you've taken to read it and for any comments you leave!
 

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Test ride both and see which one feels more comfortable.

There is no clear way to say whether you're ready for 600 supersport or not.

As long as you know how to control your right wrist, then the 600rr is a safer bike. Better brakes, suspension, handling, etc
 

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Just from the way you sound, you seem ready to me. Besides idiots only people that shouldn't be riding a 600 are those that are yet to learn clutch throttle brake coordination.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks so much for your info guys and I love the link to the video clips. ... riding like that that is a long long way away. The bike you have is the same colour I would like or maybe the x-ray, both look awesome.
 

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Rinonz's suggestion is spot on. Go get a feel for both bikes and see which suits you best. Then get whichever you feel comfortable with.

There's no epiphany that suddenly makes you "ready" for a supersport. Just like you had to learn on your CB400, you will have to LEARN all over again on the RR. The only difference is that by now you probably have a solid grasp on the fundamentals of control and basic physics of riding.

Those basics don't change. What changes is the bike's nature. The RR will be more sensitive to rider input and less forgiving to mistakes. If you have the fundamental mechanics of riding (clutch control, throttle control, etc) the transition will be easier. You're still going to have to re-learn how to start smoothly, shift without over-revving, etc.

Get the bike that makes you happy, use your head, and take your time getting comfortable with the new machine!
 

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Agree with the responses above... I'll add my $0.02 as well. Just keep in mind that a bike, no matter what size, style, etc., is only going to do what you as the operator tell it to do. Take a good look at yourself, your riding style, mistakes you may have made in the past and if you've learned from them, your self control (or maybe lack of), etc.; and evaluate yourself honestly. Afterward you should be able to come to your own conclusion if you are ready or not...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks so much for your thoughts guys. Just a couple more quick questions, I know all aspects of riding need to be practiced, but is there any aspects that need to be concentrating on, eg. Throttle control, braking, cornering etc? As anyone got any good advice or techniques that I could practice? Also one last question is there a particular model that is more user friendly, should I go for a new model or s older one. Thanks guys!
 

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I always recommend that people gte some riding experience before jumping on a 600. 8000 kms is plenty. Go for it.

There are three main generations of 600rr. The 03-04 had old-style forks. The 05-06 was very simliar but had inverted forks, which are a little mroe trick. The last major redesign was in 2007, so anything 2007 or later looks pretty much like anything else. They added ABS eventually, which might not be a bad idea. If I was getting a commuter bike I'd get the oldest, cheapest one I could find that hadn't been abused.
 

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Having owned 3 600RR span over 2.5 generations; I can safely say they are all very user friendly.

My first one which is an 06 is nice; easy to ride.
The 07+ is considerably lighter and you can feel it in comparison to the older model.

Power handling etc are very similar. So pick one that you like the look the best and ride it.
 

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Whereabouts in Aus are you? I'm in Sydney...

You'll be fine, I did 7 months on a cbr125r and then 4 months on a gs500f before I moved up to the RR, and 21,000km's later (just on the 600RR alone), no problems!

The CB400 is a good bike for having developed your skills, although -- if you want a mix of commuting and spirited riding, it's still a great bike. The RR isn't very commuter friendly, but it's great fun and I still use it for commuting.

Forget the 650A, either keep the 400 for a bit longer or go for the RR.
 

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I'd say go with the 600rr. I've just spent my first season on a RR after a two year hiatus from riding after a very severe crash in 2012.

As a smaller guy (5'7") it's very easy to handle and very fast and nimble.

I would agree that it is not very commuter friendly. Very aggressive riding positing. I don't commute with my 2012 rr just use it for weekend joy rides in the New England twisties. ;)

If you like commuting and less aggressive riding the 650 is a great bike!





Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I live in karratha, North West WA. My daily commute to work is only about 40kms there and back, so comfort is not such a big thing for me. There are some nice twisty country roads, with not much traffic where I practice basic skills. In a couple of years my family and I will be moving down to perth, in which time I hope to have learned enough road craft to survive in city traffic and on free ways etc. I must confess the initial reason why I wanted an RR is because they look bloody awesome, but now I've read some books and and got a few basic techniques down, I'm super keen to get my skills up on a Supersport and start going to track days and other bike meetings. It's something I've been really interested on since I was a kid but just never got round to doing it with my family commitments etc. Again guys thanks for the comments I really appreciate them, it's great getting so many people's opinion!
 

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Go for it. While I agree with the wisdom of building experience on a more forgiving bike first, sometimes too big a deal is made out of "big boy" bikes like the 600 SS class. It isn't some mythical beast you have to train a lifetime to face, it's just a bike... A fast bike but a bike nonetheless. You don't sound like a dumb kid so as long as you continue being mature about it I'm sure you'll be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Haha thanks AF4iK, I know exactly what you are saying. A definite fault of mine is that I over analyze things, especially when I'm not too sure of something. I only know 5 people with road bikes and while I value there opinion, none of them have ridden the RR. I think the best thing to do is go out and get one, take it easy and give it the respect it deserves and have some fun learning
 
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