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Would you recommend it? After having started on a 600 would you pick something less powerful in retrospect? I rode my buddies f4i last weekend and fell in love with it. Went to a dealership and decided that if I buy a bike it's going to be the 600rr. BTW I've never riden a motorcycle before this f4i.
 

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You will find the debate split.....half say “go for it” the others say “don’t do it”.

As the 600RR is a docile beast at reasonable speeds and prudent throttle input it is not the bike that is going to maim or kill you. If you are mature enough to start out slow and never out ride your abilities, you will be fine. The biggest challenge comes when after a few miles under your belt, you get cocky with visions of Valentino Rossi and decide that you need to keep-up with your riding buddies or go into a corner too hot. These phenomena can of course happen on any motorcycle; however on the RR it happens a lot quicker and at much greater speeds due to the bikes ability for performance and rapid acceleration.

The other factor to consider is that most people end up dropping there bike at some point early in the riding experience. This is why it is suggested to buy a lighter older used bike (EX-500, EX-250) and learn on that.

If you take on the mantra “learn to be smooth and the speed will come in time”, ride a motorcycle with 100% concentration as apposed to the typical, lackadaisical mindset while driving a car, and allow yourself about $1000 for quality riding apparel, you will do fine.

Take the MSF class and read a few of the books explaining Sportbike riding.
 

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daleCarlsbad said:
You will find the debate split.....half say “go for it” the others say “don’t do it”.

As the 600RR is a docile beast at reasonable speeds and prudent throttle input it is not the bike that is going to maim or kill you. If you are mature enough to start out slow and never out ride your abilities, you will be fine. The biggest challenge comes when after a few miles under your belt, you get cocky with visions of Valentino Rossi and decide that you need to keep-up with your riding buddies or go into a corner too hot. These phenomena can of course happen on any motorcycle; however on the RR it happens a lot quicker and at much greater speeds due to the bikes ability for performance and rapid acceleration.

The other factor to consider is that most people end up dropping there bike at some point early in the riding experience. This is why it is suggested to buy a lighter older used bike (EX-500, EX-250) and learn on that.

If you take on the mantra “learn to be smooth and the speed will come in time”, ride a motorcycle with 100% concentration as apposed to the typical, lackadaisical mindset while driving a car, and allow yourself about $1000 for quality riding apparel, you will do fine.

Take the MSF class and read a few of the books explaining Sportbike riding.
Well said. My RR was my first bike ever. I'd never even been on dirt bikes prior. The first day was shaky, but after getting used to the bike, I don't think it's any better/worse than another bike to learn on. Like stated before, just don't do anything stupid and outside of your abilities, and you'll be okay. I don't feel like ruining the plastic on my brand new bike, so I'm pretty conservative. :icon_lol:
 

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Personally, if you have a complete and functioning brain on your shoulders, there is no problem starting out on a 600, just make sure your first order of business is the MSF beginners course and you will learn a ton plus leave there feeling very confident. That is a whole lot better than riding around nervous and tense. I started on a 600 11 years ago and although they were not as fast then as they are now, it's all relative to your maturity (mine was lacking at the time by the way)
 

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Talk to any professional rider and you'll get the answer that starting on a newer 600 is a bad idea if you want to learn to ride well. However, if you're wondering if you'll be able to survive starting on the RR and just be able to ride it then listen to all the folks on here that argue for it. They are correct, as long as you are level headed and careful 75% of the time you'll be ok. However, if that other quarter percent of the time where an emergency situation comes up that a new rider doesn't handle correctly where twisting the throttle on the RR will get you in way more trouble than if you had been on a more docile machine. In the end, it's your money and you've probably already made up your mind, take the MSF, and always wear your gear.
 

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As mentioned take a MSF class right away. The class is like $150, but if you join Honda Rider's Program ($35) They will pay $75 towards the class.

Also..........three really good books to read and reference.

Sport Riding Techniques: How To Develop Real World Skills for Speed, Safety, and Confidence on the Street and Track. By Nick Ienatsch

Total Control: High-Performance Street Riding Techniques. By Lee Parks.

Twist of the Wrist II. By Keith Code

books
 

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GA_RR said:
Talk to any professional rider and you'll get the answer that starting on a newer 600 is a bad idea if you want to learn to ride well. However, if you're wondering if you'll be able to survive starting on the RR and just be able to ride it then listen to all the folks on here that argue for it. They are correct, as long as you are level headed and careful 75% of the time you'll be ok. However, if that other quarter percent of the time where an emergency situation comes up that a new rider doesn't handle correctly where twisting the throttle on the RR will get you in way more trouble than if you had been on a more docile machine. In the end, it's your money and you've probably already made up your mind, take the MSF, and always wear your gear.
very well said. That is true that if you start on a smaller bike you will learn to ride much better.
 

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this is my first, i have no regrets and wouldnt change it if i could. but its your money and your life and you know yourself better than anyone else, if you think you can handle it or not is up to you, just remember these are race bikes with head lights and turn signals
 

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the RR is my first bike. ive enjoyed it so far. only been down once and it was because someone failed to yield for me and blocked my lane. just dont ever get to cocky. thats what everybody always tells me. dont push it to hard till your comfortable. i just take my time and enjoy the ride. gettin better everyday.
 

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i just completed the second day of my msf course and i would suggest that if you have never rode before then take the course first. im going to be getting a 600rr in july. its going to be more enjoyable because i actually have an idea of what i am doing now. i have a big high school parking lot behind my house that is going to get a lot of use when i first get this bike.
 

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always remember that no matter what bike you buy and ride
your right hand controls the throttle and not the other way around
IE e you can get in trouble very easy even if you are riding a 250 cc
bike AND TAKE THE MSF course check out thsi link for a great read
http://mrthrottle.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=178
 

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Ive know people who started on full blown liter bikes before and they still have all their limbs and walk upright...

You need to ask yourself if YOU feel your responsible enough to control the power that the 600RR will deliver...its no moped and WILL beat your ass if you dont respect it. I dont feel people should be discouraged from starting out on a larger bike...it will quickly teach you your limits but will be enough bike that you wont get bored with it. Granted, i dont think you should LEARN to ride on a sport bike, but i see absolutly ZERO problems with having one as your first as long as you know how to opperate it safely and can respect what it will do.
 

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Learnt to ride on a cbr250. Took it everywhere, Touring, trackdays, commuting, dayrides etc etc. Rode it for a good 2 years before upgrading to the 600rr.

Personally, I wouldn't want to learn on a 600, especially a new one. I threw the 250 around without too much care, and that's what really taught me what I know.

Having said that though, I do love the 600rr. Wouldn't have anything else. Except maybe a 400.... either cbr400(NC29) or vfr400 as dedicated track bike.
 

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EsotericRR said:
very well said. That is true that if you start on a smaller bike you will learn to ride much better.
that is ABSULUTELY true. start smaller than a 600 and its hp deficit will force you to be a better rider. this is assuming that your goal is to ride quick in the canyons or on the track. if you're just going to be commuting, riding around town or to the next bike nite than you can probably start on a 600...but I still wouldnt.

if you Do want to be quick in the canyons/track then a smaller (ie less hp) bike is the way to go. it will require you to corner better in order to make good time and thats where you'll learn smooth cornering.
 
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