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Discussion Starter #1
Since yesterday I have almost been hit 6 times. All of them retarded. I mean I'm right beside you or ahead of you and still you don't see me........I'm going to start breaking mirrors and kicking doors soon.

And the worst part is they sometimes swerve out of my lane, swerve back into their lane, then speed up and still come the #u(% over.

Has anyone else seen an increase in the morons on the road recently.

Worst part is wife was behind me yesterday when Ialmost got creamed 3 times.......now she wants me to sell the bike. I'm talking I almost got killed andit wasn't even rush hour.
 

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Driving has gotten worse over the years due to gadgets like ipods, cell phones, bluetooths, GPS systems, and most of the time people are reading or the usual, makeup, eating, drinking, not doing a head check. It might help to wear a reflector vest even during the daytime. It may not look that cool but I would rather live to ride for another day. Ride safe
 

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I had a guy pull out in front of me the other morning. He made eye contact with me and hesitated, then pulled out. Luckily he stopped in the right hand lane, and I was already in the left hand lane and it wasn't anything too dramatic.
 

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i know most of you have read this but i will take this chance and post again here
so more members can read it too

STREET STRATEGIES ( must read )


Watch drivers' heads and mirrors
Watching the head movements of drivers through their windows and mirrors is an excellent way to anticipate sudden moves. Most drivers won't lunge left or right without first moving their heads one way or the other (even if they don't check their mirrors).


Trust your mirrors, but not totally
Your bikes mirrors can be life-savers, but they don't always tell
the entire story even if they are adjusted properly. In traffic, always buttress your mirror generated rear view with a glance over the appropriate shoulder. Do it quickly and you'll add an extra measure of rearview and blind spot knowledge to your info gathering tasks.


Never get between a vehicle and an off ramp
This sounds almost too simple but drivers who decide to exit at the last minute kill plenty of riders each year. The simple rule then, is to never position yourself between a vehicle and an offramp. Passing on the right is generally a no-no, but in this day and age it's sometimes necessary. So if you do it do so between exits or cross streets.


Cover your brakes
In traffic, you must often react very quickly, which means not fumbling for the brake lever or pedal. Always keep a finger or two on the brake lever and your right toe close to the rear brake pedal. When that cell phone-yakking dorks cuts across your path trying to get to the 7-Eleven for a burrito supreme, you'll be ready.


Be noticed
Make sure drivers and pedestrians can see you, even from a distance.
Ride with your high beams on during the day (as a courtesy turn it off when sitting behind someone at a light) and wear brightly colored gear, especially your helmet and jacket.


Be ready with power
In traffic ride in a gear lower than you normally would so your bike is ready to jump forward instantly if asked (not everyone rides open-class twins after all). Doing so gives you the option of leaping ahead instead of being limited to just using the brakes when that pickup suddenly moves over. The higher revs might also alert more cagers to your presence.


Traffic slowing? stay left (or right)
When traffic slows suddenly stay to the left or right of the car in front of you. This will give you an escape route if needed. It will also keep you from becoming a hod ornament if the car behind you fails to stop in time. Once you've stopped, be ready; clutch in, your bike in gear and your eyes on the mirrors. You never know.


Practice the scan
Constantly scanning your entire environment while riding-from instruments to mirrors to the road ahead to blind spots to your left and right and rear keeps you aware and in touch with your situation, and therefore better able to react. Dwelling on one area too long; watching only behind or in front of you, for instance, is just begging for trouble.

Left turn treachery
When approaching an oncoming car that's stopped and about to turn left, be ready. Your bright should be on so the driver can see you (during the day) but don't rely on this to save you. Watch the car's wheels or the driver's hands on the steering wheel if you see movement be ready to brake, swerve or accede, whichever seems best for the situation.


Study the surface
Add asphalt conditions to your scan. Be on the lookout for spilled oil, antifreeze or fuel; it'll usually show up as shiny pavement. Also, keep an eye out for gravel and/or sand which is usually more difficult to see. Use your sense of smell too; often you can smell spilled diesel fuel before your tires discover how slippery the stuff is.


Ride in open zones
Use your bike's power and maneuverability to ride in open zones in traffic. In any grouping of vehicles there are always some gaps, find these and ride in them. Doing so will separate you from four - wheelers, give you additional room to maneuver and allow you to keep away from dangerous blind spots. And vary your speed; riding along with the flow can make invisible to other drivers especially in heavy traffic.


Use that thumb
Get into the habit of canceling your turn signals often regardless of the traffic situation. A blinking signal might tell drivers waiting to pull into the road or turning left in front of you that you are about to turn when you aren't. So push that switch a few times each minute. Better to wear out that switch than eat a Hummer's hood, eh?


It's good to be thin
A huge advantage single-track vehicles over four- wheelers is their ability to move left and right within a lane to enable the rider to see what's ahead or through their windshields, seeing what's coming can give you lots of extras time to react.


More than one way out
Yeah, motorcycles fall down, but they're also light, narrow and hugely maneuverable, so you might as well learn to exploit their strengths when things get ugly, right? So don't just brake hard in a hairball situation. There's almost always an escape route. Swerving into Mrs. Smith's front yard could be a lot better then centerpunching the Buick that turned left in front of you. Always have an escape route planned and update it minute by minute.


Running interference
This one’s easy and we'll bet most of you already do it; let larger vehicles run interference for you when negotiating intersections. If the bonehead coming toward you from the left or right is going to blow the light, better they hit the box van next to you, right? For the same reasons, don't lunge through an intersection as soon as the light turns green. Be patient and use the vehicles next to you as cover.

ADDITONAL INFO
thanks Backstreet
Practice quick safe stops on all road surfaces and conditions. Learn the distance you can stop within. If you go 75+ know how to stop from 75+. This gives you a better appreciation for speed and following distances.

Look as far ahead as possible especially around corners. Scan but use your side vision so you always have "one eye" looking ahead. Limit your speed so that you could stop within the distance you can see ahead. One day - you will have to stop.

My new one I'm working on is to keep track of how warm or cold your tires are during the ride. Know how much tracition you have available. My tires went cold last week as the sun went down and I slid the rear under power out of a turn.

More than one way out
Yeah, motorcycles fall down, but they're also light, narrow and hugely maneuverable, so you might as well learn to exploit their strengths when things get ugly, right? So don't just brake hard in a hairball situation. There's almost always an escape route. Swerving into Mrs. Smith's front yard could be a lot better then centerpunching the Buick that turned left in front of you. Always have an escape route planned and update it minute by minute.
 

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You really need to be cautious in the mornings. People are up early, they're in bad moods, they're groggy, depressed, have bad jobs, tired, or hungover, they don't want to go to work and all this makes them suspect. They aren't thinking cuz half of em' rolled out of bed sulking. I know this may sound really stupid but think about it... drivers are much worse in the morning on weekdays than they are during the day or on weekends. ****, I'm guilty of it sometimes. It's easy to zone out in a car with your coffee, laughing to howard stern, talking to your girlfriends, etc...

I try to find a good driver and stay behind him a good car or 2. I'm not the best or most experienced rider but I try my best to avoid any situation I think that may be bad. The most scariest situation I think is when you're driving on a packed highway where people are trying to go right onto another highway but the left lanes are wide open to people going straight. You have to watch out for those impatient people that get out of their merge lanes to skip a few cars and cut people off down the road to get back into the lane they just got out of. I see that alot on 495 in norther va.
 

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Cagers = HUAS. Translation. Head Up Ass Syndrome.
 

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Not sure where you're from but I find that cagers are at their worst when riding season begins as they aren't used to seeing bikes on the road. Once summer hits and they've had a few months of seeing bikes they seem to suck at life a little bit less although you should still never trust them.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I normally do ride like I'm invisible and everyone is out to kill me.....which is why I'm still alive (Or at least not posting in the crash bang boom section). I was just making the observation. Its very frustrating sometimes to see the stupidity on display.
 

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Hi everyone I am new to this Forum and new to the sportbike world but I am long time Honda fan and owner, but I would like to say that lately more and more people are driving like Sh!T. Going to work the other day it seemed like everyone in traffic was on a cell phone, eating or drinking hot coffee and spilling it on themselves so they have to swerve over three lanes and nearly kill everyone else on the road. But that's my two cents, great forum though.
 

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Johnny Candles said:
Forget that. Ride like they are trying to kill you.
Werd. I try to never stay next to a car. Always ride either in front or behind them where they can see you and can't swerve into you. I have been riding for a year and a half and have never had any serious scares (knock on wood), mainly because I am always on red alert.
 

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Get a pair of those Icon gloves with the titanium knuckles..they look very meanicing when you roll up to someones car and shake your fist!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Disco said:
Werd. I try to never stay next to a car. Always ride either in front or behind them where they can see you and can't swerve into you. I have been riding for a year and a half and have never had any serious scares (knock on wood), mainly because I am always on red alert.

I never stay beside anyone either this all happens as I'm passing them or they are slowing down or trying to pass me.
 

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Apex i ITR said:
I'm going to start breaking mirrors and kicking doors soon.

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been there, done that. I had a lady keep comming over at me in traffic. I had nowhere to go, car in front and behind me and she was trying to squeeze in between, except I was there. Now Im not a violent person by any means but this lady made my blood boil. Nice sunny day, she had her passenger window DOWN (I was in the right lane) and as she was edging over I layed on the horn (my body was literally next to her window, like I was a passenger sitting outside the car). Now you think something next to your wide open window laying on a horn would be reason to turn your head and look in that direction but no, she just kept comming over. Next thing I know I have about 3 ft between me and the curb so a decision had to be made. Obviously she was either completely ignoring my horn or completely deaf, but it came down to be pushed in to curb and go down in heavy traffic or bootfuck her mirror. Sure enough after she got a size 12 knocking her mirror off NOW she backs off turns her head and starts yelling at me!!!! Well the hell with you lady. My turn comes up so I take, somehow she gets in and follows me like a crazy woman weaving in and out of traffic to catch up and pulls up next to me at the next light and again starts screaming about her mirror. Luckily the car behind her at the light was also the car that was behind me when I booted her mirror. He heard her yelling at me and got out of his car and came up to her window where she started yelling at him telling him it was none of his business. Well this is the part where my day got so bright i couldnt stop smiling for the rest of it.. The dude, reachs in his pocket and pulls out......a badge!!! LOL. Off-duty cop on his way in for his shift. He seen the whole episode take place and while he said what I did wasnt the proper way to handle it he could definatly understand why I did it as my options were limited and growing smaller by the second and also, he would back me up if she tryed to charge me for property damage. He got a squad car there and filled them in on the story as he seen it and next thing I know car her was leaving on a flat deck :D.. Apparently her record is less the "steller", lol
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thats what you call Justice.
 

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I had a car perform a very dangerous maneuver in front of me once. I backed off and then they came to a stop ahead. I flew by them doing maybe 50 and took their mirror with me.

In retrospect it's not a good thing to do because they might take it out on the next biker they run into.

Another saftey note...would be to instal those....umm, it's something that makes your front headlight modulate....err, get brighter then dimmer, brighter then dimmer.....makes you much more noticeable...or so I hear.
 
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