Help finding problem with bike feeling soft - 600RR.net
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-25-2017, 10:25 PM Thread Starter
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Help finding problem with bike feeling soft

2009 CBR ABS

So. The best way to explain how it feels riding is "soft"... 95% of the time it's in corners, other 5% is if there's a pothole going straight. Typically, roll the throttle, the bike wants to stand up. It just feels like the bottom off the bike wants to slide out. To the point where I have to go from 30mph to 5mph to go around a corner. It feels so uncomfortable and for lack of better wording, scary.

Right now, I'm avoiding taking it to a dealer to diagnose ... but if that's my last option, I guess it's what I'll have to do. I know I've had a minor leak from a front fork seal (dealership I don't need to worry about it, it isn't bad enough at the time), and I'm thinking this might be the issue. I don't want to self fix it to find out it isn't the issue. I'm quite handy and can fix a lot of things, so I'm considering doing that.

Any thoughts?


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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-25-2017, 11:04 PM
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Age and condition of tires?
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-26-2017, 12:06 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by FightingChance View Post
Age and condition of tires?


They're relatively new. Probably <1500mi on them, maybe closer to <1000. I didn't ride much last year. Pressures seem right, according to google search and forum posts. Thought that was the issue a few months ago when we got hit with a cold front, but the ride experience has been consistent since then.


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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-26-2017, 09:10 AM
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Same issue here. I have a leaking front fork seal as well plus my bike is lowered. She does feel queezy around corners and i have a good feeling it has to do with the busted fork. The bike's also slightly pulling to the side of the leaky fork (if you sit back and let cruise). BTW watch that the oil doesnt spill on to brakes! (wipe after every ride or tie a sock around it)
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-26-2017, 01:59 PM
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A leaky fork won't make a bike pull one way or another. The forks are a rigidly connected assembly. They operate as a single unit. You can run different springs in each fork, different valves, some forks have rebound in one fork and compression in another. It will make zero difference to the position of the wheel to have one fork setting different than the other.

This is a common myth that gets spread all over.
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-26-2017, 02:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wibbly View Post
A leaky fork won't make a bike pull one way or another. The forks are a rigidly connected assembly. They operate as a single unit. You can run different springs in each fork, different valves, some forks have rebound in one fork and compression in another. It will make zero difference to the position of the wheel to have one fork setting different than the other.

This is a common myth that gets spread all over.
well explained. maybe check your steering head bearings and stem
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-26-2017, 02:51 PM
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Have you adjusted your rebound at all? Set sag?
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-26-2017, 02:58 PM
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The exact troubleshooting procedure recommended by Honda for a "Soft Suspension" from my official service manual:

-Insufficient fluid in suspension
-Incorrect fork fluid weight
-Weak fork springs
-Insufficient tire pressure
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-26-2017, 05:54 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by skeemin View Post
The exact troubleshooting procedure recommended by Honda for a "Soft Suspension" from my official service manual:



-Insufficient fluid in suspension

-Incorrect fork fluid weight

-Weak fork springs

-Insufficient tire pressure


This helps me. Thank you. Is there a way to check the fluid and fix it myself? Or is this mechanic work only?


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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-26-2017, 06:25 PM
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Once an oil seal starts leaking the fork oil gets fouled pretty quickly. Proper damping performance in a motorcycle fork, especially Honda's HMAS (w/ compression mid-valve) setup, is highly dependent on proper oil viscosity. Even with intact oil seals fork oil doesn't hold up that long. I'm assuming the oil in there is still the original stuff from 2008/2009? In any case, you should rebuild those forks ASAP.

It's not a terribly difficult job, though time consuming.. the way I work, anyway. The procedure is pretty well described in the Honda service manual, which is not hard to find. You do need a means to safely lift/support the front end. So a rear swingarm/spool stand at minimum, and up front preferably a steering head lift stand. Once you have the forks off the bike the fun really begins. Depending on how you value your time (vs how much you enjoy building up your toolkit) it might be a better idea just to send them off for rebuild. Perhaps take the opportunity to get them revalved, as well.
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post #11 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-27-2017, 01:11 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by UAV Online View Post
Once an oil seal starts leaking the fork oil gets fouled pretty quickly. Proper damping performance in a motorcycle fork, especially Honda's HMAS (w/ compression mid-valve) setup, is highly dependent on proper oil viscosity. Even with intact oil seals fork oil doesn't hold up that long. I'm assuming the oil in there is still the original stuff from 2008/2009? In any case, you should rebuild those forks ASAP.



It's not a terribly difficult job, though time consuming.. the way I work, anyway. The procedure is pretty well described in the Honda service manual, which is not hard to find. You do need a means to safely lift/support the front end. So a rear swingarm/spool stand at minimum, and up front preferably a steering head lift stand. Once you have the forks off the bike the fun really begins. Depending on how you value your time (vs how much you enjoy building up your toolkit) it might be a better idea just to send them off for rebuild. Perhaps take the opportunity to get them revalved, as well.


Thanks for your reply. I think Ima just buck up and take it to a local mechanic. I know they do good work, so Ima just do it. I'll save my own tinkering for something more forgiving, rather than starting with my forks lol


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